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Wednesday, September 9
 

09:00 MDT

More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics
More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics is a three-day online training course taught by Anthony Williams of Just Software Solutions. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a good knowledge of C++, and familiarity with the C++11 standard thread library.
Students will require a laptop with one of the following compilers to handle the example code:
  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 or later.
  • gcc 7 or later
  • clang 5 or later


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Anthony Williams

Anthony Williams

Just Software Solutions Ltd
Anthony Williams is the author of C++ Concurrency in Action.


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 14:00 MDT
Classroom-Williams

09:00 MDT

Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++
Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++ is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Phil Nash. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

  • Be comfortable with the basics of C++. Being an expert not required
  • A laptop with a reasonably modern OS.
  • A compiler capable of running C++11 (ideally gcc, clang or VC++) – don’t worry if it’s not what you use in your day job.
  • A development environment you’re comfortable with. I can provide short term CLion licenses if you’d like (please let me know beforehand if possible)
  • An open mind and motivation to find better ways of doing things.


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Nash

09:00 MDT

Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts
Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Nicolai Josuttis. It has been one of our most popular classes. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ including C++11.
Students are not required to bring any laptop. We will go through code examples together with the laptop of the presenter.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Nicolai Josuttis

Nicolai Josuttis

IT Communication
Nicolai Josuttis (http://www.josuttis.com) is well known in the programming community because he not only speaks and writes with authority (being the (co-)author of the world-wide best sellers The C++ Standard Library (www.cppstdlib.com), C++ Templates (www.tmplbook.com), C++1... Read More →


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Josuttis

09:00 MDT

Managing Memory
Managing Memory is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Patrice Roy. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

The target audience is intermediate-level developers who:
  • Are familiar with modern C++, meaning C++11 and more in this case, without necessarily being experts
  • Seek to develop a deeper understanding of memory management concepts and mechanisms made available to them in C++
  • Want the programs they write to be faster, safer and more correct

Junior developers can benefit from this course if they are willing to explore this part of the C++ language. Developers coming to C++ from another language might find the course surprisingly instructive, as they might gain a better understanding of the workings of other languages too. More advanced developers might also enjoy this course if looking for a greater familiarity with modern C++ and its usefulness in their daily tasks.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Roy

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Design Patterns
Modern C++ Design Patterns is a three-day training course with programming exercises taught by Klaus Iglberger. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should have a solid base knowledge of C++ and at least one to two years of experience with the language. Additionally, the course is interesting for you if several of the following statements apply to you:
  • You are not aware of the impact of dependencies on code quality
  • You don’t know the SOLID principles or don’t consider them for your work
  • You believe object-oriented programming is about inheritance relationships
  • You consider moving functionality into classes the preferred design choice
  • You don’t comprehend the arcane rules when the compiler is generating the special member functions for you
  • You don’t know the details of move semantics
  • You want to reevaluate classic design patterns
  • You want to get an impression on modern C++ design patterns
  • You wonder about type erasure and expression templates or their value


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Iglberger

09:00 MDT

Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters
Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Andreas Fertig. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ (at least 98 with a basic understanding of C++11).

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Andreas Fertig

Andreas Fertig

Unique Code
Andreas Fertig is the CEO of Unique Code GmbH, which offers training and consulting for C++ specialized in embedded systems. He worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.Andreas is involved in the C... Read More →


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Fertig

09:00 MDT

System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++
System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++ is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Charley Bay. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should:
  • Have solid knowledge of C++ and familiarity with common C++ idioms and code patterns
  • Be able to deeply explore priorities and constraints for at least one industry domain
  • Be prepared to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon past project-level successes and failures (yours or those raised by other participants)
  • Be excited to share with and learn from real-world experts facing similar challenges in different domains, but which expose solutions and insight into your domain


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Charley Bay

Charley Bay

Charley Bay
Charley is a software developer with over three decades of experience using C++ in multiple regulated and high-performance fields focused on large-scale and distributed systems in performance-sensitive environments including time-sensitive processing of large data sets, performance... Read More →


Wednesday September 9, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Bay
 
Thursday, September 10
 

09:00 MDT

More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics
More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics is a three-day online training course taught by Anthony Williams of Just Software Solutions. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a good knowledge of C++, and familiarity with the C++11 standard thread library.
Students will require a laptop with one of the following compilers to handle the example code:
  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 or later.
  • gcc 7 or later
  • clang 5 or later


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Anthony Williams

Anthony Williams

Just Software Solutions Ltd
Anthony Williams is the author of C++ Concurrency in Action.


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 14:00 MDT
Classroom-Williams

09:00 MDT

Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++
Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++ is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Phil Nash. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

  • Be comfortable with the basics of C++. Being an expert not required
  • A laptop with a reasonably modern OS.
  • A compiler capable of running C++11 (ideally gcc, clang or VC++) – don’t worry if it’s not what you use in your day job.
  • A development environment you’re comfortable with. I can provide short term CLion licenses if you’d like (please let me know beforehand if possible)
  • An open mind and motivation to find better ways of doing things.


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Nash

09:00 MDT

Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts
Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Nicolai Josuttis. It has been one of our most popular classes. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ including C++11.
Students are not required to bring any laptop. We will go through code examples together with the laptop of the presenter.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Nicolai Josuttis

Nicolai Josuttis

IT Communication
Nicolai Josuttis (http://www.josuttis.com) is well known in the programming community because he not only speaks and writes with authority (being the (co-)author of the world-wide best sellers The C++ Standard Library (www.cppstdlib.com), C++ Templates (www.tmplbook.com), C++1... Read More →


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Josuttis

09:00 MDT

Managing Memory
Managing Memory is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Patrice Roy. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

The target audience is intermediate-level developers who:
  • Are familiar with modern C++, meaning C++11 and more in this case, without necessarily being experts
  • Seek to develop a deeper understanding of memory management concepts and mechanisms made available to them in C++
  • Want the programs they write to be faster, safer and more correct

Junior developers can benefit from this course if they are willing to explore this part of the C++ language. Developers coming to C++ from another language might find the course surprisingly instructive, as they might gain a better understanding of the workings of other languages too. More advanced developers might also enjoy this course if looking for a greater familiarity with modern C++ and its usefulness in their daily tasks.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Roy

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Design Patterns
Modern C++ Design Patterns is a three-day training course with programming exercises taught by Klaus Iglberger. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should have a solid base knowledge of C++ and at least one to two years of experience with the language. Additionally, the course is interesting for you if several of the following statements apply to you:
  • You are not aware of the impact of dependencies on code quality
  • You don’t know the SOLID principles or don’t consider them for your work
  • You believe object-oriented programming is about inheritance relationships
  • You consider moving functionality into classes the preferred design choice
  • You don’t comprehend the arcane rules when the compiler is generating the special member functions for you
  • You don’t know the details of move semantics
  • You want to reevaluate classic design patterns
  • You want to get an impression on modern C++ design patterns
  • You wonder about type erasure and expression templates or their value


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Iglberger

09:00 MDT

Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters
Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Andreas Fertig. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ (at least 98 with a basic understanding of C++11).

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Andreas Fertig

Andreas Fertig

Unique Code
Andreas Fertig is the CEO of Unique Code GmbH, which offers training and consulting for C++ specialized in embedded systems. He worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.Andreas is involved in the C... Read More →


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Fertig

09:00 MDT

System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++
System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++ is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Charley Bay. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should:
  • Have solid knowledge of C++ and familiarity with common C++ idioms and code patterns
  • Be able to deeply explore priorities and constraints for at least one industry domain
  • Be prepared to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon past project-level successes and failures (yours or those raised by other participants)
  • Be excited to share with and learn from real-world experts facing similar challenges in different domains, but which expose solutions and insight into your domain


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Charley Bay

Charley Bay

Charley Bay
Charley is a software developer with over three decades of experience using C++ in multiple regulated and high-performance fields focused on large-scale and distributed systems in performance-sensitive environments including time-sensitive processing of large data sets, performance... Read More →


Thursday September 10, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Bay
 
Friday, September 11
 

09:00 MDT

More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics
More Concurrent Thinking in C++: Beyond the Basics is a three-day online training course taught by Anthony Williams of Just Software Solutions. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a good knowledge of C++, and familiarity with the C++11 standard thread library.
Students will require a laptop with one of the following compilers to handle the example code:
  • Microsoft Visual Studio 2017 or later.
  • gcc 7 or later
  • clang 5 or later


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Anthony Williams

Anthony Williams

Just Software Solutions Ltd
Anthony Williams is the author of C++ Concurrency in Action.


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 14:00 MDT
Classroom-Williams

09:00 MDT

Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++
Accelerated TDD: For More Productive C++ is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Phil Nash. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

  • Be comfortable with the basics of C++. Being an expert not required
  • A laptop with a reasonably modern OS.
  • A compiler capable of running C++11 (ideally gcc, clang or VC++) – don’t worry if it’s not what you use in your day job.
  • A development environment you’re comfortable with. I can provide short term CLion licenses if you’d like (please let me know beforehand if possible)
  • An open mind and motivation to find better ways of doing things.


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Nash

09:00 MDT

Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts
Advanced and Modern C++ Programming: The Tricky Parts is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Nicolai Josuttis. It has been one of our most popular classes. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ including C++11.
Students are not required to bring any laptop. We will go through code examples together with the laptop of the presenter.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Nicolai Josuttis

Nicolai Josuttis

IT Communication
Nicolai Josuttis (http://www.josuttis.com) is well known in the programming community because he not only speaks and writes with authority (being the (co-)author of the world-wide best sellers The C++ Standard Library (www.cppstdlib.com), C++ Templates (www.tmplbook.com), C++1... Read More →


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Josuttis

09:00 MDT

Managing Memory
Managing Memory is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Patrice Roy. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

The target audience is intermediate-level developers who:
  • Are familiar with modern C++, meaning C++11 and more in this case, without necessarily being experts
  • Seek to develop a deeper understanding of memory management concepts and mechanisms made available to them in C++
  • Want the programs they write to be faster, safer and more correct

Junior developers can benefit from this course if they are willing to explore this part of the C++ language. Developers coming to C++ from another language might find the course surprisingly instructive, as they might gain a better understanding of the workings of other languages too. More advanced developers might also enjoy this course if looking for a greater familiarity with modern C++ and its usefulness in their daily tasks.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Roy

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Design Patterns
Modern C++ Design Patterns is a three-day training course with programming exercises taught by Klaus Iglberger. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should have a solid base knowledge of C++ and at least one to two years of experience with the language. Additionally, the course is interesting for you if several of the following statements apply to you:
  • You are not aware of the impact of dependencies on code quality
  • You don’t know the SOLID principles or don’t consider them for your work
  • You believe object-oriented programming is about inheritance relationships
  • You consider moving functionality into classes the preferred design choice
  • You don’t comprehend the arcane rules when the compiler is generating the special member functions for you
  • You don’t know the details of move semantics
  • You want to reevaluate classic design patterns
  • You want to get an impression on modern C++ design patterns
  • You wonder about type erasure and expression templates or their value


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Iglberger

09:00 MDT

Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters
Modern C++: When Efficiency Matters is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Andreas Fertig. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Students are expected to have a basic knowledge of C++ (at least 98 with a basic understanding of C++11).

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Andreas Fertig

Andreas Fertig

Unique Code
Andreas Fertig is the CEO of Unique Code GmbH, which offers training and consulting for C++ specialized in embedded systems. He worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.Andreas is involved in the C... Read More →


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Fertig

09:00 MDT

System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++
System Architecture and Design Using Modern C++ is a three-day online training course with programming examples taught by Charley Bay. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Wednesday September 9th through Friday September 11th, 2020 (before the conference).

Course participants should:
  • Have solid knowledge of C++ and familiarity with common C++ idioms and code patterns
  • Be able to deeply explore priorities and constraints for at least one industry domain
  • Be prepared to discuss, analyze, and reflect upon past project-level successes and failures (yours or those raised by other participants)
  • Be excited to share with and learn from real-world experts facing similar challenges in different domains, but which expose solutions and insight into your domain


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Charley Bay

Charley Bay

Charley Bay
Charley is a software developer with over three decades of experience using C++ in multiple regulated and high-performance fields focused on large-scale and distributed systems in performance-sensitive environments including time-sensitive processing of large data sets, performance... Read More →


Friday September 11, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Bay
 
Sunday, September 13
 

09:00 MDT

Open House
Please join us from 12:00 to 14:30 for our Welcome Reception.

If that time isn't convenient, then please drop by anytime during the Open House hours to try out the Remo platform and visit all of the conference rooms.

Sunday September 13, 2020 09:00 - 12:00 MDT
Hallway Track

12:00 MDT

Welcome Reception
The Welcome Reception is an opportunity for both socializing and verifying that you're properly checked in and ready to attend sessions.

CppCon 2020 attendees, including instructors, presenters, exhibitors, sponsors, PC members, organizers, volunteers, and many of your friends, latent friends, and colleagues in the C++ community will be on hand to chat and get to know you or get to know you better.

You'll need to set up your Remo account and it is better to get that out of the way and deal with any issues early rather than when a session you want to see is starting. (We strongly recommend that you arrive early at all presentation sessions, not to get a good seat–they are all good seats online–but for the opportunity of chatting with other attendees before the session starts.)

Please take a "tour" of the conference rooms by visiting each track to verify that you have access to that track without any issues.

The theme for this year's reception is My Favorite Chocolate. Since we, obviously, won't be serving food and beverages at an online reception, we've decided that this event is BYOChocolate. Have  some of your favorite chocolate with you to tantalize us with. It is show-and-tell time for your favorite chocolate and you don't even have to share any!

If you don't care for chocolate, you can just lord it over the rest of us that you don't have this silly addiction and have some other guilty pleasure one hand to show us.

In addition to socializing and exploring the online venue, we are planing some surprises that you might find amusing.

Sunday September 13, 2020 12:00 - 14:30 MDT
Hallway Track
 
Monday, September 14
 

08:45 MDT

The Beauty and Power of "Primitive" C++
Often, we focus on novel, clever, and advanced features of C++. To contrast, here I look at addressing relatively simple problems in relatively simple ways under severe constraints of performance, ease of use, and reliability. My main example is to read and write typed objects from and to a byte buffer. This is of course something we do a lot and in a bewildering variety of ways. Any object that needs to be stored or transmitted to another computer must go through such a process. However, the constrains on such reading and writing varies immensely based on the kind of data to be moved around, the performance and reliability requirements, the hardware available, and history. Many trade-offs are possible, and many different interfaces. That makes this an interesting design exercise.

This is an exploration of a design space close to the hardware and of the use of C++ in that space, rather than a standards proposal or the presentation of a mature tool chain. And, no, by “primitive”, I don’t mean “old-fashioned, C-like” code; some of the general techniques are old, but some of the code requires C++17 and much could be done better given features we are unlikely to get even in C++23.

Speakers
avatar for Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

Technical fellow, morgan stanley
C++: history, design, use, standardization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education;distributed systemsBio: www.stroustrup.com/bio.html


Monday September 14, 2020 08:45 - 10:00 MDT
all_of()
  • Design

08:45 MDT

[Overflow] The Beauty and Power of "Primitive" C++
If the all_of() track is full, then join us in generate_n() as the overflow room.


Often, we focus on novel, clever, and advanced features of C++. To contrast, here I look at addressing relatively simple problems in relatively simple ways under severe constraints of performance, ease of use, and reliability. My main example is to read and write typed objects from and to a byte buffer. This is of course something we do a lot and in a bewildering variety of ways. Any object that needs to be stored or transmitted to another computer must go through such a process. However, the constrains on such reading and writing varies immensely based on the kind of data to be moved around, the performance and reliability requirements, the hardware available, and history. Many trade-offs are possible, and many different interfaces. That makes this an interesting design exercise.

This is an exploration of a design space close to the hardware and of the use of C++ in that space, rather than a standards proposal or the presentation of a mature tool chain. And, no, by “primitive”, I don’t mean “old-fashioned, C-like” code; some of the general techniques are old, but some of the code requires C++17 and much could be done better given features we are unlikely to get even in C++23.

Speakers
avatar for Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

Technical fellow, morgan stanley
C++: history, design, use, standardization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education;distributed systemsBio: www.stroustrup.com/bio.html


Monday September 14, 2020 08:45 - 10:00 MDT
generate_n()

10:30 MDT

Back to Basics: The Abstract Machine
The compilation of every C++ program is controlled by an obscure device that remains mysterious, or even unknown, to many programmers: the C++ abstract machine. When a program is compiled, the abstract machine constructs and expresses the compiler's "mental model" of that program. It is responsible for enforcing all of the rules governing C++ programs, and ensuring that programs execute properly when those rules are observed. What's more, the abstract machine is often quite different from the physical machine, and the difference between the two can be confusing at first.

The goal of this talk is to provide an introduction to the C++ abstract machine and describe its relationship to the C++ language, how it influences the way we think about coding in C++, and its relationship to the underlying hardware upon which C++ programs execute. If you were previously unaware of the abstract machine, or have only a vague notion of what it is, then this talk is for you. Attendees will leave this session with a basic understanding of what the abstract machine is, its conception of memory, its relationship to hardware, undefined/unspecified/implementation-defined/observable behavior, and the "as-if" rule.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing


Monday September 14, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
Back to Basics
  Back to Basics

10:30 MDT

A New Decade of Visual Studio: C++20, Open STL, and More
As C++20 brings new features for C++ programmers at all levels of experience, so does our last year of work on Visual Studio and MSVC. New versions of the IDE have brought new productivity features and experience improvements for all developers, no matter what platforms they are targeting. Our open source standard library has seen contributions from across the C++ ecosystem, improving in conformance and performance. We've been hard at work on key C++20 compiler features like Concepts. We're also working on bold new ways of working on C++ projects with cloud environments.

Come along to hear about all of these as well as announcements about the future of our tools.

Speakers
avatar for Marian Luparu

Marian Luparu

Principal Product Lead, C++ Team, Microsoft
Ask me about @Code @VisualStudio and #Vcpkg
avatar for Sy Brand

Sy Brand

Microsoft
Sy Brand is Microsoft’s C++ Developer Advocate. Their background is in compilers and debuggers for embedded accelerators, but they’re also interested in generic library design, metaprogramming, functional-style C++, undefined behaviour, and making our communities more welcoming... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
count_if()
  • Compilers/Tooling

10:30 MDT

Breaking Dependencies: The SOLID Principles
SOLID is an abbreviation for five of the most important software design principles:

- (S)ingle Responsibility Principle
- (O)pen-Closed Principle
- (L)iskov Substitution Principle
- (I)nterface Segregation Principle
- (D)ependency Inversion Principle

For almost two decades, these principles have proven to be a valuable set of guidelines to cope with software dependencies. Although initially introduced as guidelines for object-oriented programming, they have become a universal set of guidelines that can be used equally well for procedural, functional or generic programming. In this talk I'll recap the SOLID principles and explain why they form such a valuable set of universal design guidelines. Also, I'll go into detail about several common misconceptions.

Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
generate_n()
  • Design

10:30 MDT

Memory-Mapped Devices as Objects
Most, if not all, modern CPUs communicate with external devices via memory-mapped device registers. A memory-mapped register is circuitry that connects to a CPU’s bus structure and responds to bus signals almost as if it were ordinary memory. Almost, but not quite.

C++ programs can use C features such as pointers and casts to access memory-mapped registers. This is still widespread practice. However, traditional C techniques tend to treat memory-mapped registers more as raw storage than as objects with constrained behaviors. C idioms for accessing memory-mapped devices leave too many opportunities for programming errors and late nights with a debugger.

This session explains various C++ techniques for placing objects into memory-mapped locations and for guaranteeing proper initialization and destruction. It shows how you can use base classes and templates to capture commonalities among different devices that use similar register layouts. By applying these techniques, you’ll be able to package memory-mapped devices as lightweight class objects that are easy to use correctly and hard to use incorrectly.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Saks

Dan Saks

President, Saks & Associates
Dan Saks is the president of Saks & Associates, which offers training and consulting in C and C++ and their use in developing embedded systems. Dan used to write the “Programming Pointers” column for embedded.com online. He has also written columns for numerous print publications... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
Embedded

10:30 MDT

Template Metaprogramming: Type Traits (part 1 of 2)
Template metaprogramming is a vast subject, but there are a small number of basic fundamental idioms that are used over and over. Mastery of these idioms will help in reading, writing, and using modern C++ code. The type traits that come as part of the standard library are incredibly useful, but at times can be thought of as some form of dark magic.

In this tutorial, we will explore some of the fundamental idioms of template metaprogramming by implementing a good portion of the type traits from the standard library. In so doing, attendees will come away with a solid understanding of how to apply the fundamental template metaprogramming idioms to solve problems including, but not limited to, standard type traits.

Speakers
JH

Jody Hagins

MayStreet
Jody Hagins first compiled "C++" code in 1984, and wrote a specialized LisP editor using Zortech C++ for senior project in 1988. However, he didn't truly start programming in C++ until 1992, when he read The Greatest C++ Book Ever Written, "Advanced C++ Programming Styles and Idioms... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
destroy_n()

12:00 MDT

Back to Basics: The Structure of a Program
What's the difference between a declaration and a definition? What is a translation unit, and how is it related to the source code that you write? How would you describe the one-definition rule? What is name-mangling? If the answers to these questions are a little hazy for you, or if you would like a refresher on the fundamentals of how source code is converted into executable programs, then this talk is for you.

In this session, we'll cover the process of compiling and linking C++ source code, describing and discussing the key concepts involved in that process along the way. Attendees will leave with a basic understanding of such fundamental concepts as translation units, declarations, definitions, the one-definition rule, name-mangling, ABIs, and how the compiler and linker conspire to convert human-readable source code into binary code that executes on hardware.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing


Monday September 14, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Back to Basics

12:00 MDT

Collaborative C++ Development with Visual Studio Code
Do you contribute to open-source projects or share projects with coworkers and classmates? In this talk, you’ll learn how optimize Visual Studio Code for collaborative, cross-platform C++ development. This talk will cover recommended tools and extensions for collaborative, cross-platform development, diving deep into the C++ extension, the CMake Tools extension, the GitHub Pull Requests and Issues extension, and the Live Share extension.

During this session, we’ll build and submit a PR to an open-source CMake project in Visual Studio Code, interacting with GitHub pull requests and issues directly in the editor. You’ll also learn how to create Live Share sessions for an nontraditional pair programming experience, where you can work together while retaining personal editor preferences as well as having your own cursor. Throughout the demo, we’ll showcase Visual Studio Code’s rich, productive editing and debugging features for C++ development.

Speakers
JR

Julia Reid

Julia is a program manager on the Visual C++ team at Microsoft, focusing specifically on Visual Studio Code. Because Julia comes from a background of C++ development, she has a passion for enhancing and simplifying C++ development experiences for programmers of all levels. Within... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
count_if()

12:00 MDT

The Future of C++ Parallel and Concurrency Safety Guidelines
As we move into a world of multicore, manycore, and heterogeneous cores, we foresee a need for safety guidelines and standards for these domains. Yet most safety guidelines only cover sequential programming.

There has never really been any guidelines for safe parallel/concurrency C++. This is not an oversight. The challenge of creating safety standards and guidelines has been so involved that just focusing on the rules for sequential programming has consumed most group's time, especially as they track a rapidly changing C++ Standard. There have been only a few concurrency related-rules in HIC++, SEI CERT C++, C++CG, WG23, Khronos Safety forum(SCAF), as well as several European H2020 projects, though none of them are specifically for static analyzers, with a mixture of meta-guidelines and specific guidance. However, they have formed a useful starting point Over the last 2 years, I have been working with experts from various Safety Groups including WG23, SG1, and MISRA to develop a set of guidelines for safe concurrency and have developed nearly 100 rules which I plan to put into C++CG, and MISRA C++. We have needed this collaboration among all the groups because not everyone who is a concurrency expert is a safety experts, and vice versa. Many more people are experts in neither domain, and need to still understand how to program parallelism and concurrency safely.

In this talk, I will show some of the developing rules, none of it will be in its final form obviously, but it will develop the argument on the rationale on these rules. Some are uncheckable and are more meta-rules that are appropriate for C++ CG, such as don't use Mutex. But if you do, there are a bunch of more specific rules that you need to be aware of (i.e.e do not destroy a locked mutex while some are very specific). Others are checkable and are appropriate for a safety standard like MISRA C++ or a future Safe version of SYCL or any other heterogeneous framework. As none of these rules are in any guideline or standard as yet, there will be an opportunity for you to participate and help shape the future of safety in parallelism and concurrency.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Ilya Burylov

Ilya Burylov

Principal Engineer, Intel Corporation
Ilya is an architect of C++ software solutions for autonomous driving market. He is working on contribution into functional safety standard MISRA and C++ standard bodies in threading and vectorization.Ilya has contributed into various Intel software products such as Intel DAAL and... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Embedded
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

12:00 MDT

Calling Functions: A Tutorial
How is a function call resolved? How does the compiler find the right function and how does the compiler choose from a set of available functions? This talk will give an overview of the individual steps taken during the resolution of a function call. It will primarily focus on the different kinds of name lookup, argument deduction, and on overload resolution. Attendees will gain insight into the mechanics of (un-)qualified lookup, argument dependent lookup, two-phase lookup, name hiding, SFINAE, (viable) candiate functions, and ambiguous function calls. They will leave the talk with a much better understanding of the (sometimes surprising) details of function calls.

Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
generate_n()

12:00 MDT

Template Metaprogramming: Type Traits (part 2 of 2)
Template metaprogramming is a vast subject, but there are a small number of basic fundamental idioms that are used over and over. Mastery of these idioms will help in reading, writing, and using modern C++ code. The type traits that come as part of the standard library are incredibly useful, but at times can be thought of as some form of dark magic.

In this tutorial, we will explore some of the fundamental idioms of template metaprogramming by implementing a good portion of the type traits from the standard library. In so doing, attendees will come away with a solid understanding of how to apply the fundamental template metaprogramming idioms to solve problems including, but not limited to, standard type traits.

Speakers
JH

Jody Hagins

MayStreet
Jody Hagins first compiled "C++" code in 1984, and wrote a specialized LisP editor using Zortech C++ for senior project in 1988. However, he didn't truly start programming in C++ until 1992, when he read The Greatest C++ Book Ever Written, "Advanced C++ Programming Styles and Idioms... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
destroy_n()

13:30 MDT

The Hidden Secrets of Move Semantics
Move semantics, introduced with C++11, has become a hallmark of modern C++ programming. However, it also complicates the language in many ways. Even after several years of support, experienced programmers struggle with all the details of move semantics. And style guides still recommend different consequences for programming even of trivial classes. And in the C++ community we still discuss semantic details.

While I took the time to write up all the facts and details in my new book "C++ Move Semantics - The Complete Guide (cppmove.com), I learned a lot I wasn't aware of. Note that the final book will have 200 pages.
This talk is about the most surpising facts, even experts sometimes don't know.
Some hidden secrets so that you understand C++ a bit better.

Speakers
avatar for Nicolai Josuttis

Nicolai Josuttis

IT Communication
Nicolai Josuttis (http://www.josuttis.com) is well known in the programming community because he not only speaks and writes with authority (being the (co-)author of the world-wide best sellers The C++ Standard Library (www.cppstdlib.com), C++ Templates (www.tmplbook.com), C++1... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
destroy_n()
  • Deep Magic

13:30 MDT

Making Iterators, Views and Containers Easier to Write with Boost.STLInterfaces
Writing standard-compliant iterators is surprisingly easy to get wrong. Standard containers are tedious to write, because they have such large interfaces, involving lots of similar operations. For many years, Boost.Iterator's iterator_facade and iterator_adaptor were the state of the art for automating the creation of iterators with minimal effort. However, that library has not kept up with the evolution of C++, particularly with regard to constexpr and noexcept.

Boost.STLInterfaces is a newly-accepted Boost library that solves these problems for authors of iterators and sequence containers. It does this using the same approach as C++20's std::ranges::view_interface. The view_interface template is a CRTP base that implements all the possible view member functions when inherited by a derived type containing just begin() and end(). This pattern allows the user to use Boost.STLInterfaces to write correct iterators, views, and/or sequence containers, requiring surprisingly little code.

Speakers
avatar for Zach Laine

Zach Laine

Sr. Principal Software Engineer, Cadence Design Systems
Zach Laine has been using C++ in industry for 15 years, focusing on data visualization, numeric computing, games, generic programming, and good library design. He finds the process of writing bio blurbs to be a little uncomfortable.


Monday September 14, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
generate_n()

13:30 MDT

Back to Basics: Class Layout
In C++, as in many other languages, classes are the key feature that supports data abstraction. A C++ class is essentially a C structure, but with added capabilities that support object-oriented programming as well as better type safety, resource management, and usability.

Although some of these added capabilities require additional storage allocation or run-time support, most do not. Thus, the storage layout for a C++ class can be as simple as the layout for a C structure. Unfortunately, too many programmers imagine that classes incur space and speed penalties that simply aren’t there.

This session offers a practical look “under the hood” to see how compilers typically implement the storage layout and member access for C++ classes. It also explains how compilers typically implement member function calls. You’ll come away with a better sense of what using classes actually costs in speed and space. You’ll gain insights that will help you with a variety of programming tasks, including debugging, performance tuning, and working with objects that have rigid layout requirements.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Dewhurst

Stephen Dewhurst

President, Semantics Consulting, Inc.
Steve Dewhurst is the co-founder and president of Semantics Consulting, Inc. Steve is the author of numerous technical articles on C++ programming techniques and compiler design, is the author of the critically acclaimed books C++ Common Knowledge and C++ Gotchas, and is the co-author... Read More →


Monday September 14, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Back to Basics

13:30 MDT

Just-in-Time Compilation
Just-in-Time compilers... we've all heard of them! What are they really? Why would anyone want them, are they actually a good idea, and how do they fit in with C++ since we all use Ahead-of-Time compilers?

In this talk I'll tell you about C++ AOT compiler, JITs for dynamic language, JITs for binary translation, and dive back 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 years, way back into compiler history and read wonderful academic papers about compilers. I'll illustrate how our view of compilers is really monolithic, and how compilers through time, and still today, are actually a continuum.

Speakers
avatar for JF Bastien

JF Bastien

Software Architect, Toyota Research Institute-Advanced Development
Compiler engineer, chair of the C++ committee's language evolution working group.


Monday September 14, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
count_if()
  • Future of C++
  • Level Intermediate, Advanced, Expert
  • Tags jit

13:30 MDT

Test Driven C++
We know that testing is important, but writing tests is hard and takes time - and can be demotivating when you want to hack out features.

But what if we flipped the whole thing around? It turns out that by writing tests first the dynamic changes in unexpected ways. Testing becomes easier. Adding features becomes easier. The dopamine hit you get from seeing something work becomes more frequent. Time lost to bugs and regressions virtually disappears. You start to get invited to bigger and better parties!

Ok, one of those statements is not guaranteed - but the rest are! If you've never tried TDD (perhaps you have heard of it but been skeptical), or maybe had a bad experience in the past, this talk will give you a sound intro to how it works, how you can get started, and what you can expect to achieve.

Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Monday September 14, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Testing

14:30 MDT

AMA: Zach Laine
Join Zach Laine for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • STL algorithms 
  • STL containers
  • Unicode ⌘

Speakers
avatar for Zach Laine

Zach Laine

Sr. Principal Software Engineer, Cadence Design Systems
Zach Laine has been using C++ in industry for 15 years, focusing on data visualization, numeric computing, games, generic programming, and good library design. He finds the process of writing bio blurbs to be a little uncomfortable.


Monday September 14, 2020 14:30 - 14:55 MDT
generate_n()

15:00 MDT

AMA: Herb Sutter
This is your chance to ask your questions of Herb or, as Herb, who is Canadian, would say, "AMA, eh."

Speakers
avatar for Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter

Microsoft
Herb is the chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, a programming language architect at Microsoft, and the author of over 200 articles and 4 books about C++ and related topics.


Monday September 14, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
count_if()
 
Tuesday, September 15
 

07:30 MDT

Committee Fireside Chat
Bring your questions! This panel of representative members of the C++ standards committee is ready to discuss everything from the just-completed C++20, to how the committee is working online as we start the C++23 cycle, and what to look forward to in Standard C++ in the coming years.

Besides C++’s creator, the panelists include the current leaders of key subgroups. These leaders are responsible for language and library evolution, and topics like compile-time programming, real-time/embedded systems, AI, and teaching as the community starts to absorb all the new features in C++20.

The panel also includes representation of fresh forward-looking thinking with the heads of some of the newest national bodies to join in and participate in ISO C++.

Moderators
avatar for Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter

Microsoft
Herb is the chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, a programming language architect at Microsoft, and the author of over 200 articles and 4 books about C++ and related topics.

Speakers
avatar for Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

CUDA C++ Core Libraries Lead, NVIDIA
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

Technical fellow, morgan stanley
C++: history, design, use, standardization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education;distributed systemsBio: www.stroustrup.com/bio.html
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →
avatar for JF Bastien

JF Bastien

Software Architect, Toyota Research Institute-Advanced Development
Compiler engineer, chair of the C++ committee's language evolution working group.
avatar for Hana Dusíková

Hana Dusíková

Staff Scientist, AVAST
Hana works as a staff scientist at Avast Software. She is the Czech National Body chair for SC22 and WG21. She is also chair of WG21's Study Group for Compile-Time Programming, where C++'s future Reflection facilities are being developed.
avatar for JC Van Winkel

JC Van Winkel

SRE EDU lead educator, Google Switzerland
JC has been teaching UNIX and programming languages since 1992, working for AT Computing, a small courseware spin-off of the University of Nijmegen, the Netherlands. JC joined Google's Site Reliability Engineering team in 2010 and is both a founding member and lead educator of the... Read More →
avatar for Tony Van Eerd

Tony Van Eerd

Stunt-double for C++ Expert, Christie Digital
Tony has been coding for well over 25 years, and hopefully coding well for most of that. Previously at Inscriber, Adobe, and BlackBerry, he now enables Painting with Light at Christie Digital. He is on the C++ Committee. He is a Ninja and a Jedi. @tvaneerd


Tuesday September 15, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
all_of()

09:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Pointers and Memory
The prevailing wisdom in Modern C++ is to favor smart pointers and container classes over raw pointers and built-in arrays -- there are too many traps and pitfalls that come with using those more-primitive types. However, many C++ programmers can’t avoid using them because they’re still so prevalent in legacy C++ code and C libraries. If you have to use raw pointers and built-in arrays, then you should learn to use them safely and effectively.

This session explains the true nature of built-in pointers and arrays, and why they’re so easily confused despite actually being distinct types. It covers the rules for pointer and array type conversions, along with the mechanics of pointer arithmetic and array subscripting. It compares and contrasts pointers with references and iterators, as well as the pointer and reference member types in the STL, to help you make more informed choices about what to use when. This session also explains the origins of the types size_t and ptrdiff_t, and their relationship to size and difference types in the STL.

You’ll leave with a clearer understanding of how pointer operations behave, whether you’re using raw pointers and built-in arrays or smart pointers and container classes.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Saks

Ben Saks

Chief Engineer, Saks & Associates


Tuesday September 15, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Back to Basics

09:00 MDT

Building an Intuition for Composition
If you're fed up of reading articles about "monads" and "endofunctors" that don't give you an understanding of how they can actually help your C++ programming, this talk is for you.

Function and data composition are becoming increasingly important in C++ due to features like ranges, continuable futures, and new error handling techniques. Using real-world examples and C++ programming idioms, I'll help you build an intuition for the mathematical concepts which underpin these so that you can make the most of them in your code and build your own abstractions built on the same foundations.

Speakers
avatar for Sy Brand

Sy Brand

Microsoft
Sy Brand is Microsoft’s C++ Developer Advocate. Their background is in compilers and debuggers for embedded accelerators, but they’re also interested in generic library design, metaprogramming, functional-style C++, undefined behaviour, and making our communities more welcoming... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
destroy_n()
  • Algorithms/Functional

09:00 MDT

Modern Software Needs Embedded Modern C++ Programming
As the chair of SG14 Embedded, I like to give an update of what we have done for embedded. But this talk is much more than that. It will describe our group's collective experience in what is Embeddedwhich has come from Automotive, games, Medical, Finance and many others. The definition is surprisingly wide and covers hard- and soft-real time, wide span of seriousness, hardware, replication, response time, and supported software. For that matter, who are the Embedded programmers? I will tie this back to the two pillars of C++: a direct map to hardware and zero overhead. I will argue why we should use C++, some of the bad reasons for note using C++, and identify 2 of the biggest problems people have complained about moving to C++. Understanding that Embedded compilers may not be up to the latest standard, we plan to separate Modern C++ into 3 Ages so that we can have people to change their code with varying levels of Embedded C++ compiler support. Finally, I will show some examples of how to change from C to C++ as one of the most common case in the Embedded community. I will show some of the common c++ features for each of several cases which includes Adopting to C++ in one shot, and gradual adoption for various sizes of systems. These are some of the common cases when people need to convert to C++ from some other language in the Embedded domain. We hope this overview and deep dive at the same time will give people a better appreciation and realistic perspective of what it takes to move to Modern C++ for Embedded systems.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about


Tuesday September 15, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Embedded

09:00 MDT

A Physical Units Library For the Next C++
On CppCon 2019, Mateusz provided an overview of current solutions on the market as well as the challenges of implementing a modern C++ physical units library. This year's talk will focus on 'mp-units', the library developed by Mateusz and contributors, and proposed for the C++ standardization.

During this tutorial, we will get familiar with the building blocks of the library's framework and its most important concepts. Numerous code examples will present how to use and solve real-life problems with the library. The audience will learn how easy it is to extend it with new units, dimensions, or even whole new systems of quantities. Last but not least, Mateusz will provide a brief overview of how well this library performs compared to other products on the market.

Even if you are not interested in the physical units subject itself, you might still want to attend the talk as the library is full of C++20 features.

Speakers
avatar for Mateusz Pusz

Mateusz Pusz

Principal Software Engineer | Founder & C++ Trainer, EPAM Systems | Train IT
A software architect, principal engineer, and security champion with more than 15 years of experience in designing, writing, and maintaining C++ code for fun and living. A trainer with 10 years of C++ teaching experience, consultant, conference speaker, and evangelist. His main areas... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
generate_n()
  • Future of C++

09:00 MDT

2020: The Year of Sanitizers?
Clang-tidy is the go-to assistant for most C++ programmers looking to improve their code, whether to modernize it or to find hidden bugs with its built-in checks. Static analysis is great, but you also get tons of false positives.  

Now that you’re hooked on smart tools, you have to try dynamic/runtime analysis. After years of improvements and successes for Clang and GCC users, LLVM AddressSanitizer (ASan) is finally available on Windows, in the latest Visual Studio 2019 versions. Let's find out how this experience is for MSVC projects.  

We’ll see how AddressSanitizer works behind the scenes (compiler and ASan runtime) and analyze the instrumentation impact, both in perf and memory footprint. We’ll examine a handful of examples diagnosed by ASan and see how easy it is to read memory snapshots in Visual Studio, to pinpoint the failure.  

Want to unleash the memory vulnerability beast? Put your test units on steroids, by spinning fuzzing jobs with ASan in Azure, leveraging the power of the Cloud from the comfort of your Visual Studio IDE.  


Speakers
avatar for Victor Ciura

Victor Ciura

Principal Engineer, CAPHYON
Victor Ciura is a Principal Engineer at CAPHYON, Technical Lead on the Advanced Installer team and a Microsoft MVP (Developer Technologies).He’s a regular guest at Computer Science Department of his Alma Mater, University of Craiova, where he gives student lectures & workshops on... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing

10:00 MDT

AMA: Mateusz Pusz
Join Mateusz Pusz for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • Modern C++
  • Templates, metaprogramming
  • C++20
  • the C++ standardization process
  • Performance and Low Latency
  • Delivering online talks and workshops
  • CMake
  • Conan

Speakers
avatar for Mateusz Pusz

Mateusz Pusz

Principal Software Engineer | Founder & C++ Trainer, EPAM Systems | Train IT
A software architect, principal engineer, and security champion with more than 15 years of experience in designing, writing, and maintaining C++ code for fun and living. A trainer with 10 years of C++ teaching experience, consultant, conference speaker, and evangelist. His main areas... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 10:00 - 10:20 MDT
generate_n()

10:05 MDT

BoF: C++ Video Captioning and Translation BoF
Sen has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested in captioning and translating C++ videos such as those from the CppCon YouTube channel.

Please meet at Table 2 in the AMA Room.

Note that this table only holds eight participants. If you see that the table is full and you are just lurking, please consider surrendering your seat to another attendee.

Attendees interested in discussing captioning and translating C++ videos, can join the discussion channel at #sig_i18n_videos, or the CppLang #cppvap channel, or the C++ Video Access Project website.

Speakers
avatar for Sen Li

Sen Li

SWE (Open to Work), Looking for Google Team Match
Learning on Student Visa.Waiting for Google Team Match, Let me know if your team have an opening position!


Tuesday September 15, 2020 10:05 - 10:25 MDT
_1

10:30 MDT

C++20: An (Almost) Complete Overview
The technical work on C++20 was finished in January 2020, and is now being pushed through ISO certification.

This presentation gives an overview of (almost) all new features in both the language and the Standard Library. Some more exotic features will be left out. New language features include modules, coroutines, concepts, templated lambdas, constexpr changes, designated initializers, the spaceship operator, string literals as template parameters, feature test macros, conditional explicit, immediate functions, and more.

The second part of the session discusses the changes to the Standard Library. This includes topics such as ranges, atomic smart pointers, cancellable threads, a synchronization library, calendars, time zones, span, a formatting library, features test macros, and more.

The material is mostly the same as the "C++20: What's in it for you?" session from CppCon 2019, but it has been updated with the final standard. If you want a complete overview of all C++20 features, including references to other more deep-dive sessions at CppCon 2020 on certain topics, then this session is for you.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Gregoire

Marc Gregoire

Software Architect, Nikon Metrology
Marc Gregoire is a software architect from Belgium. He worked 6 years as a consultant for Siemens and Nokia Siemens Networks on critical 2G and 3G software running on Solaris for telecom operators. This required working in international teams stretching from South America and the... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
all_of()
  • Future of C++

10:30 MDT

[Overflow] C++20: An (Almost) Complete Overview
If the all_of() track is full, then join us in generate_n() as the overflow room.


The technical work on C++20 was finished in January 2020, and is now being pushed through ISO certification.

This presentation gives an overview of (almost) all new features in both the language and the Standard Library. Some more exotic features will be left out. New language features include modules, coroutines, concepts, templated lambdas, constexpr changes, designated initializers, the spaceship operator, string literals as template parameters, feature test macros, conditional explicit, immediate functions, and more.

The second part of the session discusses the changes to the Standard Library. This includes topics such as ranges, atomic smart pointers, cancellable threads, a synchronization library, calendars, time zones, span, a formatting library, features test macros, and more.

The material is mostly the same as the "C++20: What's in it for you?" session from CppCon 2019, but it has been updated with the final standard. If you want a complete overview of all C++20 features, including references to other more deep-dive sessions at CppCon 2020 on certain topics, then this session is for you.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Gregoire

Marc Gregoire

Software Architect, Nikon Metrology
Marc Gregoire is a software architect from Belgium. He worked 6 years as a consultant for Siemens and Nokia Siemens Networks on critical 2G and 3G software running on Solaris for telecom operators. This required working in international teams stretching from South America and the... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
generate_n()

11:35 MDT

BoF: Pair Programming
Honey has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested in pair programming.

Please meet at Table 2 in the AMA Room.

Note that this table only holds eight participants. If you see that the table is full and you are just lurking, please consider surrendering your seat to another attendee.

Moderators
HS

Honey Sukesan

Senior Software Developer, Jaguar Land Rover Ireland Services Ltd
I'm an embedded software developer working currently in Vehicle Engineering domain. I'm part of a team helping my employer to build vehicle software platform for our next generation cars. My previous domain experience was mostly with embedded healthcare domain where I got the opportunity... Read More →

Tuesday September 15, 2020 11:35 - 11:55 MDT
_1

12:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Templates (part 1 of 2)
Template Basics

This talk is a two-parter. In the first part we start with the question what is generic programming. I then will introduce the different kinds of templates: function, class and method templates. We will walk through how to write and apply. Along with that we distinguish the different types of template parameters type, and non-type using std::array as an illustration. This is accompanied by a peak behind the scenes by using C++ Insights. This should also give you a valuable tool where you can checkout details for yourself.

At this point we look at alias templates and how they can help us.

Once we covered the basics, we take care that our templates do not bloat the code. For that we use an example of passing an array and a length and optimize this. While on that, we consider at type_traits and incorporate them in our solution. With type_traits we use constexpr if for conditional compile-time code paths.

This session is for developers with C++ experience who have avoided templates so far. After attending this talk, attendees have learned to think in types rather than in values and can write their own templates.


-----


Advanced Templates

This is the second part of Templates where go more into depth. Attendees expected to know the syntax an properties of function and class templates, type_traits and constexpr if.

In this session, we look at variadic templates together with fold expressions by using a Printf like function as an example. This knowledge is then used to talk about template specializations.

At this point we will briefly talk about SFINAE. We compare it to the tag-dispatching pattern and see how C++20s Concepts make SFINAE way less scary. Next on the plate are variable templates as well as template template parameters.

This session is for developers with C++ experience who have avoided templates so far. After attending this talk, attendees have learned techniques like SFINAE and template specializations.

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Fertig

Andreas Fertig

Unique Code
Andreas Fertig is the CEO of Unique Code GmbH, which offers training and consulting for C++ specialized in embedded systems. He worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.Andreas is involved in the C... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Back to Basics

12:00 MDT

Embedded: Customizing Dynamic Memory Management in C++
Dynamic memory allocation is a natural solution for many common programming problems. In C++, new-expressions allocate dynamic memory through a function called operator new. Unfortunately, the compiler-provided implementation of operator new is often expensive to run, non-deterministic, and risks fragmenting memory over time. As a result, too many resource-constrained systems (e.g., embedded, real-time, or high-performance applications) avoid using new-expressions altogether. This is unfortunate because C++ new-expressions were designed to be highly customizable for such purposes.

This session shows how to implement customized dynamic memory managers for use in resource-constrained systems. It presents multiple forms of operator new and operator delete and explains the language mechanisms behind them. It shows how you can replace the compiler-provided operator new and operator delete with your own implementation, either globally or for individual classes. You’ll leave with a clearer understanding of how new and delete work and how you can tailor them to meet the demands of many resource-constrained applications.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Saks

Ben Saks

Chief Engineer, Saks & Associates


Tuesday September 15, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Embedded

12:00 MDT

Building a Coroutine based Job System without Standard Library
A job system is a common game engine component to improve total CPU throughput. In this talk, I will walk through building a coroutine-based job system and explain the advantages of using coroutines over the typical ways to build a job system.

We shipped coroutines in C++20, but why does it matter for users, especially since there’s no standard library support? The answer is the coroutine semantics. Developers can customize the behavior of `co_return`, `co_yield`, `co_await` to build their own systems without any dependency of the standard library. For game developers, this is important because many game studios forbid the use of the standard library. The coroutine language feature itself is flexible enough to build a system with 100% control, which is exactly what engine developers want—no black box, no magic.

I will discuss the design decision I made, trade-offs, and current limitations. This talk is a crash course for system developers who want to build systems independently from the standard library and will also discuss possible future directions for this language feature.

This is an advanced coroutine talk and I expect attendees to have basic understanding about how (c++)coroutine works. Here is a useful link for some related materials if you want more information before attending this talk: https://gist.github.com/MattPD/9b55db49537a90545a90447392ad3aeb

Speakers
avatar for Tanki Zhang

Tanki Zhang

Real-time Rendering Engineer, NVIDIA
Tanki is a real-time rendering engineer at NVIDIA. He has been an active member of both the C++ community and the graphics community. As a game developer focused on game engine technics, he is passionate about different new knowledge and is excited to try things out.


Tuesday September 15, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
generate_n()
  • Future of C++

12:00 MDT

Closing the Gap between Rust and C++ Using Principles of Static Analysis
Did you know that 70% of serious security bugs are a result of memory safety issues? As a C++ developer, you may have heard about the safety benefits of Rust language. Although both Rust and C++ are high-performing system programming languages, we are increasingly hearing from customers and security researchers to have stronger safety and correctness guarantees in C++. Safety and correctness are no longer viewed as an opt-in behavior. The new adage is – if it compiles, it works. Static analysis has proved to be a valuable tool in empowering developers write modern C++. In this talk, I will share some ideas on how we can use the same principles in modern C++ code to provide strong statically-checked guarantees out-of-the-box. I will demonstrate some of these techniques live using MSVC’s code analysis tool.

Speakers
avatar for Sunny Chatterjee

Sunny Chatterjee

Principal Software Engineering Manager, Visual C++, Microsoft Corporation
Sunny leads a team responsible for developing the core C++ static analysis engines in Visual Studio productivity experience as well as the traditional security tooling scenarios used widely within Microsoft. He has many years of experience in static analysis and enjoys delivering... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
count_if()
  • Safety/Error Handling

13:00 MDT

AMA: Tanki Zhang
Join Tanki Zhang for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • Game and Game Engine Development
  • Computer Graphics
  • General C++

Speakers
avatar for Tanki Zhang

Tanki Zhang

Real-time Rendering Engineer, NVIDIA
Tanki is a real-time rendering engineer at NVIDIA. He has been an active member of both the C++ community and the graphics community. As a game developer focused on game engine technics, he is passionate about different new knowledge and is excited to try things out.


Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:00 - 13:20 MDT
generate_n()

13:05 MDT

BoF: Meson Build System
Jussi has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested in Meson.

Please meet at Table 2 in the AMA Room.

Note that this table only holds eight participants. If you see that the table is full and you are just lurking, please consider surrendering your seat to another attendee.

Attendees interested in discussing Meson and other tools, can join the discussion channel at #sig_tooling.

Moderators
JP

Jussi Pakkanen

Consultant, Rakettitiede oy

Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:05 - 13:25 MDT
_1

13:30 MDT

Back to Basics: Templates (part 2 of 2)
Template Basics

This talk is a two-parter. In the first part we start with the question what is generic programming. I then will introduce the different kinds of templates: function, class and method templates. We will walk through how to write and apply. Along with that we distinguish the different types of template parameters type, and non-type using std::array as an illustration. This is accompanied by a peak behind the scenes by using C++ Insights. This should also give you a valuable tool where you can checkout details for yourself.

At this point we look at alias templates and how they can help us.

Once we covered the basics, we take care that our templates do not bloat the code. For that we use an example of passing an array and a length and optimize this. While on that, we consider at type_traits and incorporate them in our solution. With type_traits we use constexpr if for conditional compile-time code paths.

This session is for developers with C++ experience who have avoided templates so far. After attending this talk, attendees have learned to think in types rather than in values and can write their own templates.


-----


Advanced Templates

This is the second part of Templates where go more into depth. Attendees expected to know the syntax an properties of function and class templates, type_traits and constexpr if.

In this session, we look at variadic templates together with fold expressions by using a Printf like function as an example. This knowledge is then used to talk about template specializations.

At this point we will briefly talk about SFINAE. We compare it to the tag-dispatching pattern and see how C++20s Concepts make SFINAE way less scary. Next on the plate are variable templates as well as template template parameters.

This session is for developers with C++ experience who have avoided templates so far. After attending this talk, attendees have learned techniques like SFINAE and template specializations.

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Fertig

Andreas Fertig

Unique Code
Andreas Fertig is the CEO of Unique Code GmbH, which offers training and consulting for C++ specialized in embedded systems. He worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.Andreas is involved in the C... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Back to Basics

13:30 MDT

40 Years Of Evolution from Functions to Coroutines
The evolution of a callable stands for the evolution of C++. Here are the main evolution steps.

It all started with a function. Additionally, C++98 supports objects that behave like functions. These function-like objects are called function objects, and can have state.
C++11 added lambda expressions to the C++ standard. Lambda expressions behave like data and support in-place invocation and capturing of state. Lambdas can be generic in C++14, constant expressions in C++17, or templates in C++20.
C++20 generalizes the idea of something callable. Functions in C++20 are pausable and resumable. These generalized functions are known as coroutines and are the means of choice to program asynchronously.

Each step in this long evolution is way more than just syntactic step. Each step empowers new and more powerful ways to solve challenging programming tasks.

Speakers
avatar for Rainer Grimm

Rainer Grimm

Trainer, Modernes C++
Rainer works as a software architect, team lead, and instructor since 1999. In 2002, he created a further education round at his company. He gives seminars since 2002. Rainer's first seminars were about proprietary management software, but seminars for Python and C++ followed immediately... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
destroy_n()

13:30 MDT

Dealing with Embedded Limitations
Many embedded systems have requirements on latency, memory usage, and resource consumption. This is especially true of safety-critical and security-related systems. Many programmers and organizations worry that using C++ features will prevent them from meeting these requirements. Some avoid using specific features such as exception handling, while others avoid using C++ entirely.

This panel will discuss the challenges and benefits of using C++ in embedded contexts. We will explore ways that embedded systems can leverage the power of Modern C++ features to meet their guarantees. We will discuss which concerns are based in fact and which concerns are based on misconceptions.
Feel free to bring your own questions about anything that you believe inhibits your use of modern C++ on an embedded system. We will discuss pre-selected questions as well as audience submissions.


Moderators
avatar for Ben Saks

Ben Saks

Chief Engineer, Saks & Associates

Speakers
avatar for Brett Searles

Brett Searles

Principal Architect, Attobotics
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Papke

Daniel Papke

Software Engineer, Collins Aerospace


Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Embedded

13:30 MDT

C++20 STL Features: One Year of Development on GitHub
At CppCon 2019, Microsoft open-sourced its implementation of the C++ Standard Library. In the year since then, we've worked with many contributors on GitHub, adding dozens of C++20 features. In this talk, we'll explore some of these C++20 features and how you can use them in your code (even if you don't use our implementation). We'll also take a tour of microsoft/STL development on GitHub and our intensive code review process.

Examples of C++20 features we'll explore: span which makes working with contiguous sequences easier, constexpr algorithms which make it possible to verify that lookup tables are sorted at compile time (or just sort them at compile time!), erase_if() which finally supersedes the "erase-remove idiom", integer comparison functions which make it easier to write correct code without worrying about the Usual Arithmetic Conversions, and make_shared() for arrays which extends the classic "single allocation" optimization.

We're using GitHub issues and pull requests for all development, and we're recording a detailed Changelog in a GitHub wiki page. If you want to follow our progress, this talk will explain how to find what we're working on and what remains to be done. This talk will also show how we use a GitHub project to track PRs as they go through multiple stages of review. (The span PR accumulated almost 700 comments before being merged!) If you're interested in contributing, whether it's a small improvement or an entire feature, seeing this process should help.

Speakers
avatar for Stephan T. Lavavej

Stephan T. Lavavej

Principal Software Engineer, Microsoft
Stephan T. Lavavej is a Principal Software Engineer at Microsoft, maintaining Visual C++'s implementation of the C++ Standard Library since 2007. He also designed a couple of C++14 features: make_unique and the transparent operator functors. He likes his initials (which people can... Read More →


Tuesday September 15, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
generate_n()
  • Future of C++

15:00 MDT

Lightning Talks
Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →

Tuesday September 15, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
destroy_n()
 
Wednesday, September 16
 

07:30 MDT

AMA: Bjarne Stroustrup
Here is your chance to ask the creator of C++ what he was thinking. 😀

Moderators
avatar for Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter

Microsoft
Herb is the chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, a programming language architect at Microsoft, and the author of over 200 articles and 4 books about C++ and related topics.

Speakers
avatar for Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

Technical fellow, morgan stanley
C++: history, design, use, standardization, future; performance, reliability; software developer education;distributed systemsBio: www.stroustrup.com/bio.html


Wednesday September 16, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
count_if()

07:30 MDT

Lightning Talks
Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →

Wednesday September 16, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
destroy_n()

09:00 MDT

Back To Basics: Lambda Expressions
Lambdas were first introduced into C++ with the release of the groundbreaking C++11 standard. New capabilities like generic lambda expressions and generalized captures were added in C++14. A few years ago, with the release of C++17, additional new features like constexpr lambda expressions were added. With the new release of C++20 even more features will added, some of which may change the way lambda expressions are used.

There are several parts to a lambda expression and in order to use them efficiently and effectively, you really need to master all the pieces. Do you know when to capture by value or capture by reference? Can the lifetime of variables be altered by a lambda expression? What are the ways to pass a lambda expression and is this a good idea? Our goal is to answer these questions and talk about the constraints lifted with each new version of C++. Multiple examples will be shown to illustrate what can be done with lambda expressions.

During this presentation developers will have the opportunity to learn or review the fundamentals about lambda expressions by studying the terminology. Once someone clearly understands the difference between a function object, function pointer, functor, and anonymous function, we have a great foundation for lambda expressions. We will be able to use our knowledge to reason about generalized captures and what it really means to capture "this".

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Geller

Barbara Geller

Cofounder, CopperSpice
I am an independent consultant with over twenty-five years of experience as a programmer and software developer. I have worked with numerous smaller companies developing in-house applications. I have also designed and developed Windows applications for several vertical markets including... Read More →
avatar for Ansel Sermersheim

Ansel Sermersheim

Cofounder, CopperSpice
I have been working as a programmer for nearly twenty years. My degree is in Computer Science from Cal Poly San Luis  Obispo. I have transitioned to independent consulting and I am currently working on a project for RealtyShares in San Francisco. Co-founder of CopperSpice... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Back to Basics

09:00 MDT

No Touchy! A Case Study of Software Architecture with Immutable Objects
Our mission at ViewRay's is to conquer cancer by reenvisioning radiation therapy

Part of this is a piece of software which supports many workflows involving communication with various external agents such as an MRI scanner, a radiotherapy linear accelerator, a database, and, of course, the human operator. This software was started from scratch at the beginning of 2019 and is developed primarily in C++17.

This talk covers the multi-threaded and multi-process architecture of the software. It focuses on one of its elements: immutable objects. This is a pattern which started with functional programming. It was popularized by Haskell and it's hugely popular in web development — the React-Redux stack, for example — but it is not that popular in C++ software development. We will talk about how we ended up sticking with immutable objects, how they helped (and sometimes hindered) our development, what we invented in order to make them practical in C++, and problems and solutions we encountered along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Borislav Stanimirov

Borislav Stanimirov

Staff Software Engineer, ViewRay
Borislav has been a C++ programmer for more than 17 years. The majority of his career has been in video games and in the past two years he's been working on software for medical devices. He has worked on C++ software for all kinds of platforms: desktops, mobile devices, servers, and... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
generate_n()
  • Design

09:00 MDT

Practical Memory Pool Based Allocators For Modern C++
Runtime-deterministic memory allocations are a crucial aspect of any safety-critical real-time system. One of the simplest and widely adopted allocation mechanisms used in such systems is a memory pool with fixed block sizes. Unfortunately, the need to know the exact sizes of the memory blocks makes any practical usage of memory pools with standard C++ allocator-based approach rather problematic since users often “hide” real properties of allocations which are made under the hood. For example: STL’s node-based containers like 'std::map' as well as other standard mechanisms like 'std::promise' or 'std::allocate_shared'.

Being a company which focuses on real-time safety-critical applications, we still see a significant value in keeping compatibility with the standard allocator model as well as in following common conventions which are familiar to every C++ developer.

This talk presents an approach which uses a combination of a memory allocator implementation which instruments the code, and an external LLVM-based tool which extracts the instrumentation information and generates static memory pool definitions, allowing the allocator to switch from the heap to a memory pool without any further changes to the code. The presentation will walk through a simplest possible implementation of this approach.

Speakers
avatar for Misha Shalem

Misha Shalem

C++ Architect, Apex.AI
C++ developer with 16+ years of experience. Currently holds position of C++ Architect at Apex.AI, Palo Alto, CA


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Embedded

09:00 MDT

Heterogeneous Programming in C++ with SYCL 2020
Computer system architecture trends are constantly evolving to provide higher performance and computing power, to support an increasing demand for high-performance computing domains including AI, machine learning, image processing and automotive driving aids. The most recent being the move towards heterogeneity, where a system has one or more co-processors, often a GPU, working with it in parallel. These kinds of systems are everywhere, from desktop machines and high-performance computing supercomputers to mobile and embedded devices.

In 2018 we presented SYCL; an open-standard, single-source standard C++ programming model for heterogeneous platforms, looking specifically at programming GPUs. Since then, as the momentum behind SYCL continues to grow, the SYCL working group within Khronos has been working hard with various hardware vendors, applications developers and universities across the industry to release an update to the standard.

The latest revision of the SYCL specification is SYCL 2020, and it brings a number of significant new features that will dramatically improve how you can program heterogeneous systems in C++.

Firstly, SYCL 2020 will introduce support for unified shared memory (USM) a new option for managing memory in SYCL alongside the existing buffer/accessor abstract which allows pointers and pointer-based structures to be passed directly to device functions. USM also provides a new explicit data management API which provides more fine-grained control over how data is allocated and moved between devices.

SYCL 2020 will also introduce a generalization of the SYCL specification which, while not altering the API in any significant way, allows SYCL implementations to target additional backends to OpenCL such as CUDA, HIP, OpenMP, etc. The most notable example of this is in the recent addition to the open-source SYCL implementation Data-Parallel C++ (DPC++) to support a CUDA backend, allowing SYCL applications to target Nvidia GPUs using the native CUDA driver.

SYCL 2020 will bump the minimum required C++ version to C++17 and will introduce a number of new features that will improve the user experience of writing SYCL applications, as well as further, align SYCL with ISO C++. This includes using class template argument deduction (CTAD) to reduce the verbosity of the SYCL AP and alignment with atomic_ref and the parallel algorithms.

Finally, SYCL 2020 will introduce a number of features which will allow applications to gain better performance by better utilising the hardware including sub-groups, group-based algorithms and optimized reductions.

This talk will present the current state of the SYCL ecosystem, including the supported implementations of which now there are four; ComputeCpp, DPC++, hipSYCL and triSYCL, as well as the range of platforms that are now supported by SYCL via these implementations. It will take a close look specifically at supporting Nvidia GPUs via DPC++’s CUDA backend, as this was a widely requested feature by SYCL developers in the C++ community.

This talk will then take a deep dive into the new features that SYCL 2020 is introducing and how these will improve SYCL application development for C++ developers.

Finally, this talk will end with a look at the SYCL standard, and where we hope to see it going in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Gordon Brown

Gordon Brown

Principal Software Engineer, Codeplay Software Ltd.
Gordon Brown is a principal software engineer at Codeplay Software specializing in heterogeneous programming models for C++. He has been involved in the standardization of the Khronos standard SYCL and the development of Codeplay’s implementation of the standard; ComputeCpp, from... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
destroy_n()

09:00 MDT

Dynamic Polymorphism with Metaclasses and Code Injection
Dynamic polymorphism in C++ has historically meant virtual functions and inheritance. However, these form only one possible design for solving this problem, and they bring several implications on performance, ergonomics and flexibility. Type erasure is another way to implement dynamic polymorphism, as demonstrated in several talks by Sean Parent and adopted in other languages, such as Rust’s trait objects. But implementing type erasing objects which provide ergonomic interfaces in C++ is cumbersome and error-prone, leading to a large family of types and libraries with subtly different semantics and lower adoption rates compared to inheritance.

This talk will present a possible future design for interface-based type erasure in C++ that marries the convenience of inheritance to the benefits which it otherwise lacks. It will introduce the code injection and metaclasses facilities which are proposed for inclusion in C++ along with a prototype implementation of the design based on the experimental metaclasses Clang fork.

Speakers
avatar for Sy Brand

Sy Brand

Microsoft
Sy Brand is Microsoft’s C++ Developer Advocate. Their background is in compilers and debuggers for embedded accelerators, but they’re also interested in generic library design, metaprogramming, functional-style C++, undefined behaviour, and making our communities more welcoming... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
count_if()

09:00 MDT

Quickly Testing Qt Desktop Applications with Approval Tests
You've inherited some Qt GUI code: it's valuable, but it doesn't have tests, and it wasn't designed to be testable, so you need to start refactoring. But you can't refactor safely until the code has tests, and you can't add tests without refactoring! How can you ever break out of this loop?

The talk will review the challenges and potential sources of error that are specific to code that uses the Qt cross-platform graphical user interface library, and then describe how to guard against them.

There are many options for unit-testing Qt code, including Qt Test, Google Test and Catch. As well as covering those, and general principles for applying them, I will present a small but surprisingly effective C++11 library for applying "Approval Tests" to cross-platform Qt code.

Finally, the talk will briefly cover some other tools that can aid with inspecting and maintaining Qt code, which can in turn improve testability.

Attendees will discover some quick, practical techniques to help write unit tests and integration tests for Qt code.

Speakers
avatar for Clare Macrae

Clare Macrae

Director, Clare Macrae Consulting Ltd
Clare has worked in software development for over 30 years, and in C++ for 20 years. Since 2017, she has used her spare time to work remotely with Llewellyn Falco on [ApprovalTests.cpp](https://github.com/approvals/ApprovalTests.cpp), to radically simplify testing of legacy code... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Testing

10:00 MDT

AMA: Gordon Brown and Michael Wong
Join Gordon Brown and Michael Wong for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • Heterogeneous computing
  • SYCL
  • Executors

Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Gordon Brown

Gordon Brown

Principal Software Engineer, Codeplay Software Ltd.
Gordon Brown is a principal software engineer at Codeplay Software specializing in heterogeneous programming models for C++. He has been involved in the standardization of the Khronos standard SYCL and the development of Codeplay’s implementation of the standard; ComputeCpp, from... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 10:00 - 10:20 MDT
destroy_n()

10:00 MDT

AMA: Sy Brand
Join Sy Brand for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • Visual Studio, VS Code, MSVC, Vcpkg
  • Functional programming in C++
  • Metaclasses
  • Inclusivity and diversity

Speakers
avatar for Sy Brand

Sy Brand

Microsoft
Sy Brand is Microsoft’s C++ Developer Advocate. Their background is in compilers and debuggers for embedded accelerators, but they’re also interested in generic library design, metaprogramming, functional-style C++, undefined behaviour, and making our communities more welcoming... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 10:00 - 10:20 MDT
count_if()

10:30 MDT

Performance Matters
Performance is one of the chief reasons why many C++ programmers love the language. In the past, Moore's Law meant that our programs ran faster every year. Now that Dennard scaling has ended, C++ programmers have to work harder to get high performance for their applications. In this talk, I'll first discuss some of the significant and surprising challenges facing C++ programmers trying to achieve high performance on modern hardware platforms: performance is far less stable and predictable than you might think! I'll present some experimental evidence that strongly suggests we can't count on compiler optimizations to help us out of this hole: in particular, I'll show -- using a new experimental methodology -- that the difference between clang's -O2 and -O3 optimization levels is essentially indistinguishable from noise.

Since compiler optimizations have run out of steam, we need better profiling support, especially for modern concurrent, multi-threaded applications. I'll talk about a new approach to profiling, which I call "causal profiling". Causal profiling lets programmers optimize for throughput or latency, and which pinpoints and accurately predicts the impact of optimizations. It works by running performance experiments, based on the idea of "virtual speedups". We've built a causal profiler called Coz, which now ships as part of standard Linux distros, and which also works for C++ and Rust (there's even a Java version). Using it, we find that Coz can unlock previously unknown optimization opportunities. Guided by Coz, we improved the performance of Memcached (9%), SQLite (25%), and accelerated six other applications by as much as 68%; in most cases, this involved modifying less than 10 lines of code and took under half an hour (without any prior understanding of the programs!).

Speakers
avatar for Emery Berger

Emery Berger

Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Emery Berger is a Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the flagship campus of the UMass system, where he co-directs the PLASMA @ UMass lab. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
all_of()
  • Deep Magic

10:30 MDT

[Overflow] Performance Matters
If the all_of() track is full, then join us in generate_n() as the overflow room.


Performance is one of the chief reasons why many C++ programmers love the language. In the past, Moore's Law meant that our programs ran faster every year. Now that Dennard scaling has ended, C++ programmers have to work harder to get high performance for their applications. In this talk, I'll first discuss some of the significant and surprising challenges facing C++ programmers trying to achieve high performance on modern hardware platforms: performance is far less stable and predictable than you might think! I'll present some experimental evidence that strongly suggests we can't count on compiler optimizations to help us out of this hole: in particular, I'll show -- using a new experimental methodology -- that the difference between clang's -O2 and -O3 optimization levels is essentially indistinguishable from noise.

Since compiler optimizations have run out of steam, we need better profiling support, especially for modern concurrent, multi-threaded applications. I'll talk about a new approach to profiling, which I call "causal profiling". Causal profiling lets programmers optimize for throughput or latency, and which pinpoints and accurately predicts the impact of optimizations. It works by running performance experiments, based on the idea of "virtual speedups". We've built a causal profiler called Coz, which now ships as part of standard Linux distros, and which also works for C++ and Rust (there's even a Java version). Using it, we find that Coz can unlock previously unknown optimization opportunities. Guided by Coz, we improved the performance of Memcached (9%), SQLite (25%), and accelerated six other applications by as much as 68%; in most cases, this involved modifying less than 10 lines of code and took under half an hour (without any prior understanding of the programs!).

Speakers
avatar for Emery Berger

Emery Berger

Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Emery Berger is a Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the flagship campus of the UMass system, where he co-directs the PLASMA @ UMass lab. He graduated with a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Texas... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
generate_n()

12:00 MDT

A Relaxed Guide to memory_order_relaxed
The out-of-thin-air (OOTA) and read-from-untaken-branch (RFUB) properties of the specification of memory_order_relaxed have resulted in considerable consternation over the years. Although there are no known instances of full-blown OOTA behavior, and no known RFUB-induced failures of production code, the theoretical possibility of these properties severely complicates automated analysis of large C and C++ code bases. Thus far, attempts to eliminate OOTA and RFUB properties from the memory model have resulted in otherwise needless added overheads on weakly ordered systems on the one hand or excessive implementation complexity on the other. However, memory_order_relaxed never was intended to be used in arbitrary code, but rather as a part of deliberate application of specific concurrency designs. This talk provides an initial catalog of patterns underlying such designs.

Speakers
PE

Paul E. McKenney

Software Engineer, Facebook
Paul E. McKenney has been coding for almost four decades, more than half of that on parallel hardware, where his work has earned him a reputation among some as a flaming heretic. Paul maintains the RCU implementation within the Linux kernel, where the variety of workloads present... Read More →
avatar for Hans Boehm

Hans Boehm

Google
Hans is a software engineer at Google, where he has been since March 2014. He now works mostly on concurrent programming issues, both generally, and focussed on Android. Hans is an ACM Fellow, and a past Chair of ACM SIGPLAN (2001-2003). Until late 2017 he chaired the ISO C++ Concurrency... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Embedded

12:00 MDT

Just-in-Time Compilation: The Next Big Thing?
JITting code is a feature of many languages but has not yet landed in C++. However, there has been some work to integrate JITting into Clang by Hal Finkel. Having a JIT compiler offers flexibility at runtime without sacrificing compile-time performance, and can take advantage of late optimizations that maybe even better than those available at compile-time.

C++ is still in the early stages of exploring JIT capabilities. In this talk, we'll expand the boundaries and the possibilities of JITting in C++ by combining C++20 features with the clang-jit compiler work introduced in P1609. We'll show some use cases we find non-obvious and exciting and that may change the future of compile-time programming by blurring the boundary between compile-time and runtime.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Deane

Ben Deane

Quantlab
Ben was in the game industry for 23 years, at companies like EA and Blizzard. For the last couple of years he's been working in the finance industry at Quantlab. He's always looking for useful new techniques in C++, and he geeks out on algorithms, APIs, types and functional progr... Read More →
avatar for Kris Jusiak

Kris Jusiak

Senior Software Engineer, Quantlab Financial, LLC
Kris is a Senior Software Engineer passionate about programming and has worked in different industries over the years including telecommunications, games and most recently finance for Quantlab Financial, LLC. He has an interest in modern C++ development with a focus on performance... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
destroy_n()

12:00 MDT

Exploration of C++20 Meta Programming
In this talk, we will take the journey to compile-time.

We will start with adding templates to existing program, and overview overload resolution and conditioning at compile time.

We will continue with exploring the latest version of template metaprogramming updated by the release of C++20.

Finally, we will present techniques to control the compiled-time logic when instantiating templates, on C++20 and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
count_if()

12:00 MDT

Cross-Platform Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them
C++ cross-platform development is difficult. These difficulties are compounded by the fractured solution field, where every project seems to use a different combination of build systems, package managers, and diagnostic tools to address shared challenges. Join us for a discussion and demo of C++ cross-platform development centered on common pitfalls and widely adopted tooling.

Learn how to leverage CMake to seamlessly build across operating systems and platforms. Untangle your dependencies with tools like vcpkg and Conan to avoid inconsistencies between system package managers. Debug your projects across multiple platforms with Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code. We’ll also take a brief look into how to use CI and testing to get in front of issues before they even happen.

Speakers
ES

Erika Sweet

Program Manager, Microsoft
Erika is a Program Manager on the Visual C++ Team at Microsoft. She likes math and mystery novels. She is currently working on developer tools to support C++ cross-platform development.


Wednesday September 16, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
generate_n()

12:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Unit Tests
Automated unit tests can accelerate software development by quickly identifying regressions, clarifying interface requirements, and encouraging more modular designs. However, actually incorporating unit tests into your development process can be intimidating. Choosing a unit testing framework can be a daunting task because there are so many frameworks with such wide-ranging capabilities. Moreover, even when using a really good framework, crafting effective tests is a skill that takes time to master.

This session takes you through the process of writing automated unit tests for realistic code, working from very simple tests up to more complex ones. It starts with a brief introduction to automated testing and test-driven development. It shows you the first steps toward using automated unit tests in your development process.

In this session, you’ll learn the practical benefits of a unit testing framework through examples using Google Test. You’ll see how you can simplify difficult tests using dependency injection and Google Mock in addition to Google Test. Along the way, you’ll learn about different testing strategies, as well as concepts such as test coverage and ordering dependencies. Whether you’re new to automated testing or looking for a way to test challenging components, this session will help you take the next step toward more reliable, test-driven software.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Saks

Ben Saks

Chief Engineer, Saks & Associates


Wednesday September 16, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Back to Basics
  • Testing

13:05 MDT

BoF: Build Systems
Rob has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested in Build Systems.

Please meet at Table 2 in the AMA Room and then overflow into tables 3, 4, etc. as necessary.

Note that each table only holds eight participants.

Attendees interested in discussing build systems and other tools, can join the discussion channel at #sig_tooling.

Moderators
avatar for Robert Boehne

Robert Boehne

Sr. Software Architect, Datalogics, Inc.
This year, I'm using Clang Sanitizers, CMake and Conan to deliver our legacy  library with the highest quality possible.  I'd like to learn more about how to use Docker and Jenkins (together or not) to run static analysis or other checks.I've been a C++ developer since 1997, most... Read More →

Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:05 - 13:25 MDT
_1

13:30 MDT

Effective Remote C++ Development with Codespaces
The rise of remote work and the growth of team sizes present a challenge for C++ developers. Many C++ projects have complex hardware and software requirements, making onboarding of new team members and productive coding from home harder than they need to be. We need tools to ease configuration of your team's development environments and grant them access to the processing power they need from wherever they are in the world.

This presentation will show how Codespaces can use the power and flexibility of the cloud to address these issues. Codespaces give you the ability to quickly create a managed online development environment specific to your project that you can access from anywhere. We'll look at the problems which hit C++ developers particularly hard, like long build times and dependency management. Finally, we'll show the tool in action to give you a feel for how your teams could leverage it, and more broadly get you to think about what parts of your team's development process can be streamlined.

Speakers
avatar for Nick Uhlenhuth

Nick Uhlenhuth

Program Manager, Microsoft


Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:30 - 14:00 MDT
generate_n()

13:30 MDT

C++20 String Formatting Library: An Overview and Use with Custom Types
C++20 introduced a nice formatting library with std::format(). This session will explain what the formatting library provides, how to use all of its functionality, and most importantly, how you can customize it so that you can use formatting strings that include your very own custom types and custom formatting parameters, and of course, how to handle errors.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Gregoire

Marc Gregoire

Software Architect, Nikon Metrology
Marc Gregoire is a software architect from Belgium. He worked 6 years as a consultant for Siemens and Nokia Siemens Networks on critical 2G and 3G software running on Solaris for telecom operators. This required working in international teams stretching from South America and the... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:30 - 14:00 MDT
count_if()
  • Future of C++

13:30 MDT

Back to Basics: Algebraic Data Types
One of the hallmarks of "modern C++" is a transition from classic object-orientation to value semantics with algebraic data types such as `variant` and `tuple`. In this session we'll explain the math behind the name, and we'll delve deep into the meaning and usage of all of the algebraic data types in C++17: pair, tuple, optional, and variant. These types have some commonalities, such as the use of type-traits to access their component types, and a common approach to implicit conversions and comparisons. We'll show how to use std::optional for deferred initialization and how to replace dynamic polymorphism with visitation over a std::variant. We'll even deliver some guidance on when NOT to return a tuple, and on how you should think about variant's "valueless by exception" state.
Attendees will leave this session with a newfound appreciation for C++'s algebraic data types.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Back to Basics
  Back to Basics

13:30 MDT

Constructing Generic Algorithms: Principles and Practice
"You have all these algorithms at your disposal. *Learn them.*"
-- Sean Parent, GoingNative 2013.

Great advice, and the algorithms can do a lot. But they can't do everything, and
the fixed set in the standard was never meant to be the last word in every
problem. Sometimes we do need to write our own solutions. What are the best
practices for that?

This talk examines how to build our own algorithms. We'll start with a raw loop
that solves a nontrivial problem, and turn it into a generic algorithm capable
of supporting a wide variety of use cases without loss of expressivity or
efficiency.

Along the way we'll consider algorithmic patterns, how to structure the
interface, how the types interact, iterator category concerns, testing, and
more. We'll look at how ranges and concepts help us to refine and focus things.
We'll also see where the existing algorithms fall short, and take a look at some
non-obvious use cases, including some minor modifications or wrappings that give
us extra flexibility.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Deane

Ben Deane

Quantlab
Ben was in the game industry for 23 years, at companies like EA and Blizzard. For the last couple of years he's been working in the finance industry at Quantlab. He's always looking for useful new techniques in C++, and he geeks out on algorithms, APIs, types and functional progr... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
destroy_n()

13:30 MDT

Get Off My Thread: Techniques for Moving Work to Background Threads
If you're writing a GUI application and you want the interface to feel "responsive" to the user then you need the code that response to UI events to be short and fast. Similarly, if you are handling network I/O you may not want the processing of one request to prevent the system receiving further input.

If the work to be done in response to an event is complex and time consuming then you can maintain the "responsiveness" of the system by passing the work off to a background thread.

This talk will look at the ways of doing this, including managing ongoing work, providing progress updates, and cancelling work if it is no longer needed.

Speakers
avatar for Anthony Williams

Anthony Williams

Just Software Solutions Ltd
Anthony Williams is the author of C++ Concurrency in Action.


Wednesday September 16, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Embedded
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel
  • Level Intermediate, Advanced, Expert
  • Tags concurrency

14:10 MDT

The Many Shades of reference_wrapper
You may have heard of std::reference_wrapper's role in make_tuple, but this is not today's topic. The role that reference_wrapper plays is larger than unwrapping references in C++ standard library API. It is the language's response to the need for references with rebinding semantics, which may explain why such a small utility is still receiving love and polishes in C++20.
To put it in the other way, every reference in Python is rebindable -- with garbage collection, of course. But the semantics in common implies that reference_wrapper may be very useful. This talk will go through these use cases, see how reference_wrapper's design carefully enables them through details. The talk will also compare reference_wrapper with other facilities in the language and the standard library to give you hints about how to choose from the reference-like types.

Speakers
avatar for Zhihao Yuan

Zhihao Yuan

HPC Engineer, SimpleRose Inc
Zhihao Yuan is an HPC Engineer at SimpleRose Inc. He participated in standardizing designated initializers and improved narrowing conversions in C++20. After giving a talk on CppCon to advocate NOT to program any macros, he dived into a project where the number of identifiers that... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 14:10 - 14:40 MDT
count_if()

14:10 MDT

Design Patterns for Handling and Reporting Errors in C++ Programs Using Parallel Algorithms and Executors
C++17 already has parallel algorithms.  Executors (P0443, hopefully in C++23) will add asynchronous execution to parallelism.  The usual C++ error handling approach, exceptions, will not work "out of the box."  We need to build up new patterns for error handling.

C++ parallel algorithms and executors have several challenges handling errors.  First, errors can happen nonlocally -- in parallel tasks other than my own -- yet they can affect correctness of an entire parallel algorithm.  Second, notification of errors may be deferred: I may not find out about an error right away.  Third, I may need to take explicit action to find out about an error.  Fourth, checking whether an error has occurred somewhere might have a performance cost.  Finally, letting exceptions propagate across certain boundaries may have unfortunate consequences: the program might crash without respecting destructors and stack unwinding, or it might even "hang" (become unresponsive).

I'm not offering canned solutions to these issues.  However, we don't have to start from scratch: this situation shares much in common with others that have been around for decades.  Examples include non-C++ interfaces to C++ libraries, boundaries between graphical user interface and back-end code, and distributed-memory parallel code.  My experience is mainly with distributed-memory parallel code that uses MPI, the Message Passing Interface that has seen nearly 30 years of continuous use and evolution.  In this talk, I'll show how design patterns already exist for parallel error handling, and I'll apply these design patterns to C++17 parallel algorithms, executors (P0443r13), and parallel algorithms for executors (P1897r3).

Speakers
avatar for Mark Hoemmen

Mark Hoemmen

Scientific software developer, Stellar Science
Mark Hoemmen has a B.S. in mathematics and computer science from the University of Illinois, and a PhD in computer science from the University of California Berkeley. His background is in numerical linear algebra and parallel computing. Mark has 20 years' professional experience as... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 14:10 - 14:40 MDT
generate_n()
  • Safety/Error Handling

14:40 MDT

AMA: Mark Hoemmen
Mark Hoemmen has been developing parallel libraries and applications for over a decade.

He is working with others on a linear algebra library for the C++ Standard.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Hoemmen

Mark Hoemmen

Scientific software developer, Stellar Science
Mark Hoemmen has a B.S. in mathematics and computer science from the University of Illinois, and a PhD in computer science from the University of California Berkeley. His background is in numerical linear algebra and parallel computing. Mark has 20 years' professional experience as... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 14:40 - 15:00 MDT
generate_n()

14:40 MDT

AMA: Zhihao Yuan
Join Zhihao Yuan for a hallway-style discussion on:
  • C++ features he gets involved, such as CTAD, designated initializers, etc.
  • FreeBSD.
  • Teaching C++ as a first programming language.
  • C++ vs. Python.
  • The standards committee.
  • China.
  • Open-source.

Speakers
avatar for Zhihao Yuan

Zhihao Yuan

HPC Engineer, SimpleRose Inc
Zhihao Yuan is an HPC Engineer at SimpleRose Inc. He participated in standardizing designated initializers and improved narrowing conversions in C++20. After giving a talk on CppCon to advocate NOT to program any macros, he dived into a project where the number of identifiers that... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 14:40 - 15:00 MDT
count_if()

15:00 MDT

BoF: Game Development
Nathan has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested in Game Development.

Please meet at Table 2 in the AMA Room and overflow into Tables 3, 4, 5, etc.

Note that each table only holds eight participants.

Attendees interested in discussing game development, can join the discussion channel at #sig_game_development.

Moderators
NW

Nathan Ward

Student, CU Boulder

Wednesday September 16, 2020 15:00 - 15:30 MDT
_1

15:00 MDT

Lightning Talks
Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →

Wednesday September 16, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
destroy_n()

15:45 MDT

ArcGIS Runtime for Qt
A brief introduction to the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt

This will be a 10 minute presentation, followed by a 5 minute Q/A session.

* This session will be held in the Esri Expo Room. *

Speakers
avatar for James Ballard

James Ballard

Developer, Esri
Lead Software Engineer for the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt.Worked at Esri since 2008.


Wednesday September 16, 2020 15:45 - 16:00 MDT
_1

16:30 MDT

C++ Pub Quiz
What is C++ Pub Quiz, you ask? It's trivia night CppCon style — five rounds, ten questions per round. Write down your team’s answers on a sheet of paper and turn it in at the end of the round.

Remo's "table" system seems ideal for this, so here's the deal: We'll meet in this event's Remo room at the scheduled time. Join a table near the front of the room with whoever you want to be on your team; turn on your mic in Remo. In the Remo general chat, I'll post a Google Meet URL and a Google Form URL. Open the Google Meet in a second tab; turn off your mic in Google Meet.

Each team should pick a team name, and designate a "team captain" who will use the Google Form to submit their answer sheet at the end of each round.

I'll read each round's questions into the Google Meet. (You will be listening in the Google Meet; or, you might designate a "team communications officer" who will be in the Meet with their mic off and their speakers on, relaying the audio through to everyone at their Remo table. Either way should work.) During the round, feel free to converse with your teammates around the table. At the end of the round, the "team captain" will submit your answer sheet via the Google Form, and we'll have a short break while I tally the scores.

High score after five rounds wins both the game and the bragging rights!

Staff
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Wednesday September 16, 2020 16:30 - 18:30 MDT
generate_n()
 
Thursday, September 17
 

07:30 MDT

Community Organizers Panel
Are you a C++ community leader? Would you like to be?

If you are or would like to be working to build a C++ community, either on-line or in meat space, we'd like to hear from you about your challenges and your successes.

We'll hear from successful community leaders, answer questions, and share resources and ideas. We'll discuss user groups, conferences, podcast, and online communities and forums.

Moderators
avatar for Jon Kalb

Jon Kalb

Conference Chair, Jon Kalb, Consulting

Speakers
avatar for Jens Weller

Jens Weller

Meeting C++ / Community Organizer, Meetingcpp GmbH
Jens Weller has worked, since 2007, as a freelancer in C++, specialising in consulting, training and programming C++. He started with programming C++ back in 1998. He is an active member of the European C++ community and the founder of the Meeting C++ platform and conference. Jens... Read More →
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
generate_n()

07:30 MDT

Lightning Talks
Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →

Thursday September 17, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
destroy_n()

07:30 MDT

C++ Committee's Library Evolution Working Group
Come join the leaders of the C++ Committee's Library Evolution Working Group to discuss the latest developments in and future of the C++ Standard Library.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Billy Baker

Billy Baker

Software Architect, FlightSafety International
Billy Baker has developed deterministic real-time flight simulation software using C++ for FlightSafety International, Evans and Sutherland and Boeing since 1997. At C++ committee meetings, he can be found in library groups including chairing SG18, Library Evolution Working Group... Read More →
avatar for Tom Honermann

Tom Honermann

Sr Staff Software Engineer, Synopsys
Tom Honermann is a software engineer at Synopsys where he has been working on the Coverity static analyzer for the past 9 years.  His first C++ standard committee meeting was Lenexa in 2015.  He currently chairs the SG16 text and Unicode study group and participates SG15 tooling... Read More →
avatar for Corentin Jabot

Corentin Jabot

Corentin Jabot is a freelance developer and member of the C++ committee and is mainly interested in portability and API design.


Thursday September 17, 2020 07:30 - 08:30 MDT
count_if()

08:40 MDT

Supercharge your productivity with CLion and just a few easy tricks
Think that learning to be productive with a complex tool like CLion takes a big investment? You might be surprised just how much you can get down with just a handful of simple shortcuts. One of them even makes it easy to find everything else you might need. We'll look at navigating code like a pro, finding and fixing code issues on the fly, refactoring and even generating code.

Join us in the JetBrains Demo Room.

(This demo is also presented at 14:45 today.)

Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Thursday September 17, 2020 08:40 - 08:55 MDT
_1

09:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Smart Pointers
From the library's perspective, an essential feature in C++11 was smart pointers.

Since C++11, we have four different smart pointer: std::auto_ptr, std::unique_ptr, std::shared_pointer, and std::weak_ptr. With C++17 std::auto_ptr was removed and with C++20, we get an std::atomic<std::shared_ptr>, and std::atomic<std::weak_ptr>.

Each smart pointer models a specific ownership semantic and has a particular purpose. The crucial question is, therefore: When should you use which smart pointer? The answer to this question becomes more sophisticated when you think about the arguments or the return value of a function. You have to answer the following question for the function arguments:

- What does it mean to take the function arguments by pointer, by std::unique_ptr, or by std::shared_ptr?
- Should the function take the smart pointer by value or by reference?
- Should the argument be const or not?

The answers to those questions are not the end of the story. When you have a factory function creating something, the question immediately arises: Should the factory function return its product by a pointer, by std::unique_ptr, or by std::shared_ptr?

Smart pointers are more than pointers decorated with smartness. Smart pointer models ownership semantic. Understanding the ownership semantic of smart pointers is the main topic of my talk and, therefore, your takeaway.

Speakers
avatar for Rainer Grimm

Rainer Grimm

Trainer, Modernes C++
Rainer works as a software architect, team lead, and instructor since 1999. In 2002, he created a further education round at his company. He gives seminars since 2002. Rainer's first seminars were about proprietary management software, but seminars for Python and C++ followed immediately... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Back to Basics

09:00 MDT

Pipes: How Plumbing Can Make Your C++ Code More Expressive
In code we work with collections of objects all the time, yet it's not always easy to operate on them with concise and expressive code.

Traversing collections with for loops gets ugly and brittle as soon as they have more than a few lines.
STL algorithms are a big step further, but they don't compose well (ever had the need for a "transform_if" algorithm?)
Ranges are another big step further, but like every library they don't cover all cases (Did you know about the transform-filter performance problem? Or that you're not allowed to use rvalues as inputs? Or that you have to use tuples when working on several collections?)

In this talk you will discover pipes, another way to write expressive code to operate with collections: write your code as plumbing through which your data flows.

Like every library pipes also have their limitations, which we will present, but using them as a complement of ranges and STL algorithms will bring you the following benefits:
- An efficient transform-filter
- zip two collections without using tuples
- send data to several outputs
- use rvalues as inputs and as intermediate results
- pick up the data coming out of STL algorithms
- integrate results in destination containers
- pipes are very easy to implement, so you can add new ones

Come see how pipes can improve your code!

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Boccara

Jonathan Boccara

Lead Principal Software Engineer, Murex
Jonathan Boccara is a Principal Engineering Lead at Murex where he works on large codebases in C++.His primary focus is searching how to make code more expressive. He has dedicated his blog, Fluent C++, to writing expressive code in C++. He also gives internal trainings on C++ every... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
count_if()
  • Algorithms/Functional

09:00 MDT

A Multi-threaded, Transaction-Based Locking Strategy for Containers
With the concurrency tools available in the modern C++ standard library, it is easier than ever to create multi-threaded programs. When we write such applications, there are sometimes cases in which a container simply must be shared among multiple threads. Of course, sharing is trivial if the only operations on the container are reads. In the case where reads greatly outnumber writes, acceptable performance is often attainable with a reader/writer mutex type, like std::shared_mutex. But suppose that the number of writes is similar to, or even greater than, the number of reads -- how does one then perform simultaneous reads and writes on a single container?

One common usage pattern is that, for a given operation, sets of related records are read and updated together. In order to prevent data races and inconsistent views of the data, such sets must be locked together as a unit before any of them can actually be read or updated. Further, it is very easy to accidentally create deadlocks by choosing a seemingly correct locking order. In order to avoid these problems, we would like a locking algorithm that provides three important properties: atomicity, consistency, and isolation.

This talk will describe an algorithm, implemented in C++, that performs such locking based on the concept of strict timestamp ordering. Using only facilities from the C++17 standard library, it employs a straightforward approach to multi-threaded, transactional record locking that requires minimal spatial overhead and yet fulfils the requirements of atomicity, consistency, and isolation. We'll discuss the pros, cons, and limitations of the algorithm, and provide some performance measurements.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

09:00 MDT

What’s in a Name? What’s a Name In?
If it weren't for names, we would all be programming in a machine language of zeroes and ones.

C++ gives us an incredibly rich collection of language features for declaring and accessing names and their associated program artifacts. For example, C++ has several kinds of id-expressions (not just names), several kinds of scopes (not just blocks and namespaces), several kinds of declarations, and a plethora of name lookup algorithms (some with several variations).

This talk will provide deeper insights into what these language features do, how they interact, and how we programmers can take best advantage of them. Using numerous examples, we will touch upon such related topics as friendship and hidden friends, hiding and overriding, inline namespaces, labels, overloading, points of declaration, using-declarations and using-directives, visibility, and more.

Speakers
avatar for Walter E. Brown

Walter E. Brown

With broad experience in industry, academia, consulting, and research, Dr. Walter E. Brown has been a C++ programmer for over forty years, joining the C++ standards effort in 2000. Among numerous other contributions, he is responsible for introducing such now-standard C++ library... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
generate_n()
  • Design

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Safety and Security At 20
The C++20 standard is now complete and the features and changes to the language promise to be more extensive than even C++11, which started the modern age. Engineers who work in safety critical applications, security or even applications that get abused by customers every day have special needs from the language. But what does the new standard give us as far as writing clean, safe, secure code?

In this talk, we'll look at the new features and changes to the standard and see how they affect outcomes for code written for safety critical and secure environments or even code that just needs survive the day with whatever your users throw at it.

Among the features we'll look at are: ranges, concepts, std::format, std::span, std::atomic<std::shared_ptr>>, co-routines, designates initializers, spaceship operator, attributes, using enum.

As we'll see, some new features are huge wins for safety and security while others look like wins but come with their own problems.

Then we'll look ahead at what the standards committee is working on for C++23. C++20 has a lot of changes and new features. When this talk is over you'll know which features help your write clean, safe, secure code.

And which don't.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Butler

Matthew Butler

Laurel Lye Consulting
Matthew Butler has spent the last three decades as a systems architect and software engineer developing systems for network security, law enforcement and the military. He primarily works in signals intelligence using C, C++ and Modern C++ to build systems running on hardware platforms... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Embedded
  • Embedded

09:00 MDT

The Shapes of Multi-Dimensional Arrays
In 2020, linear algebra is still not a part of standard C++. Worse than that, beyond the good old C-style multidimensional arrays, the standard library still does not provide modern tools to handle such objects. In the era of machine learning and artificial intelligence, this is starting to get embarrassing. But why is that? Why does everything is always so much more complicated in C++ than in other higher level language?

In this talk we will focus on one of the many problems involved: how to handle the shapes and dimensions of high-performance multidimensional arrays? To prevent template metaprogramming wizards from providing a completely unusable answer, we will add one requirement: it has to be concise, expressive, and understandable by humans.

To answer this question, we will see how C++20's Non-Type Template Parameters can be leveraged to build a mini-embedded compile-time language to specify the size of matrices while combining expressiveness and conciseness. We will see how this technique can allow to mix static and dynamic dimensions while ensuring the highest level of performance. We will also discuss how it could be exploited to express parallelization and vectorization, as well as sparse storage patterns. At the big picture level, this talk will also explore why bringing generic Non-Type Template Parameters may have opened a very nice Pandora's box in C++.

Speakers
avatar for Vincent Reverdy

Vincent Reverdy

Researcher in Astrophysics and Mathematics, Ecole Normale Supérieure
Vincent has been working as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (USA) since he obtained his PhD at the Paris observatory (France) in november 2014. His main scientific interests are related to cosmology and general relativity. He his particularly... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
destroy_n()

10:05 MDT

BoF: Bazel Builds
Mark has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested Bazel builds.

We will hold this BoF in a Zoom meeting.

Topic: Bazel Builds BoF
Time: Sep 17, 2020 05:00 PM LondonJoin Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/93200206644?pwd=V3lzSG1Ybm5BODlZYWZsQnlEZFh2UT09

Meeting ID: 932 0020 6644
Passcode: 346349

Attendees interested in discussing Bazel builds and other tools, can join the discussion channel at #sig_tooling.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Zeren

Mark Zeren

Staff Software Engineer, VMware Inc.
Mark is a staff engineer at VMware where he works on Bazel builds, C++ libraries, coding standards, and toolchains.


Thursday September 17, 2020 10:05 - 10:25 MDT
_1

10:30 MDT

Neighborhoods Banding Together: Reasoning Globally about Programs
Our most detailed reasoning about programs is done locally: we consider a neighborhood of a program — usually a single function and the interfaces surrounding it — and reason about its behavior without reference to the remainder of the program. But this reasoning is in service of a larger goal: we want to ensure that the entire program behaves correctly.

In this talk, I will take local reasoning for granted, and look at the process of joining neighborhoods of local reasoning together, and the global reasoning that ensures they form a coherent whole. I will show how we can prevent incoherent joining, and prevent the emergence of unbounded non-local recursion as the program is linked together.

This talk builds upon the discussion of local reasoning in last year's talk "The Truth of a Procedure,” but is intended to be understandable independently.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Lippincott

Lisa Lippincott

Software Architect, Tanium
Lisa Lippincott designed the software architectures of Tanium and BigFix, two systems for managing large fleets of computers. She's also a language nerd, and has contributed to arcane parts of the C++ standard. In her spare time, she studies mathematical logic, and wants to make computer-checked... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
all_of()

10:30 MDT

[Overflow] Neighborhoods Banding Together: Reasoning Globally about Programs
If the all_of() track is full, then join us in generate_n() as the overflow room.


Our most detailed reasoning about programs is done locally: we consider a neighborhood of a program — usually a single function and the interfaces surrounding it — and reason about its behavior without reference to the remainder of the program. But this reasoning is in service of a larger goal: we want to ensure that the entire program behaves correctly.

In this talk, I will take local reasoning for granted, and look at the process of joining neighborhoods of local reasoning together, and the global reasoning that ensures they form a coherent whole. I will show how we can prevent incoherent joining, and prevent the emergence of unbounded non-local recursion as the program is linked together.

This talk builds upon the discussion of local reasoning in last year's talk "The Truth of a Procedure,” but is intended to be understandable independently.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Lippincott

Lisa Lippincott

Software Architect, Tanium
Lisa Lippincott designed the software architectures of Tanium and BigFix, two systems for managing large fleets of computers. She's also a language nerd, and has contributed to arcane parts of the C++ standard. In her spare time, she studies mathematical logic, and wants to make computer-checked... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
generate_n()
  • Design

12:00 MDT

C++20 Ranges in Practice
Among the many new additions to C++20 are Ranges, a modern revision of the STL offering updated algorithms and new “views” with lazy evaluation.

In this example-based talk we’ll work through several practical demonstrations of how the new Ranges functionality may be used to solve everyday problems concisely, elegantly and efficiently. In addition, we’ll offer tips on how to avoid common errors in your Ranges code, and demonstrate a couple of useful utility functions which you can drop into your codebase today.

Speakers
TB

Tristan Brindle

C++ London Uni


Thursday September 17, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
generate_n()

12:00 MDT

Managarm: A Fully Asynchronous OS Based on Modern C++
C++20 and future C++ standards are expected to massively improve the ergonomics of asynchronous I/O within the C++ ecosystem. Yet, the vast majority of current operating systems (OSes) were designed without considering asynchronous I/O to be a first-class citizen. For example, Linux is only able to perform general-purpose asynchronous I/O since the recent addition of io_uring. Even with this new asynchronous mechanism in place, many I/O operations still have to fall back to a thread-based emulation within the kernel.

In this talk, we present Managarm, an OS designed around C++20 coroutines and the upcoming C++ sender/receiver model. Its main goal is to fully support asynchronous I/O through the entire system. All I/O operations are asynchronous in Managarm, with a single blocking system call to wait for their completion. The OS implements primitive asynchronous operations using (a variant of) the C++ sender/receiver model. These primitives comprise the system call layer and basic asynchronous data structures. We discuss how this low-level functionality can be integrated into high-level C++ code that is based on coroutines. High-level coroutine code constitutes the majority of the system and enables fully asynchronous drivers and servers. This approach enables high programmer productivity and excellent performance at the same time. At the end of the talk, we discuss open challenges for system programming that C++20 does not solve yet and give a perspective on vital future work in this area.

Speakers
AV

Alexander van der Grinten

Postdoctoral Researcher, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Alexander is a postdoctoral researcher at Humboldt-University of Berlin. He is also a founder of Managarm, a fully asynchronous operating system that is written in modern C++. Alexander obtained his PhD in computer science from University of Cologne in 2018. He is professionally... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
destroy_n()

12:00 MDT

The Surprising Costs of void() (and Other Not-Quite-Innocuous Evils)
There are some things that might pass us by without us noticing them as evil or, as they have come to be known, Bad Code Smells.

Many of these little things are acceptable in some cases, and thus pass unnoticed in some code reviews. They are respectful of language rules, and thus pass unnoticed through the compiler's virtual hands. They might even lead to working code... and if it works, it's fine, no?

The idea for this talk came about when discussing with colleagues about such suspicious code and coding patterns, and hearing such questions as "but why is that a problem?". It's about those little evils that creep in code and poison our practice in subtle ways (making memory consumption higher than it should be, making execution slower than it should be, making reuse harder than it should be, etc.).

Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
count_if()
  • Deep Magic

12:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Design Patterns
Design Patterns are reusable elements of design that may help aid in making software more maintainable, flexible, and extensible. The term 'design patterns' can be traced back to at least the 1970s, although the term has been largely popularized by the 'Gang of Four' book Design Patterns, in which common software design patterns were defined and categorized. In this talk, you will learn the fundamentals of the creational, structural, and behavior design patterns. This talk is aimed at beginners who have some C++ knowledge working on a software project, but are starting to think about larger software problems. This talk will also be useful for folks who have been working in C++ for a while, but have never had a chance to study design patterns and need some resources to help orient them.

Learning about design patterns and where to apply them can at the least give you a way to think about how you solve unknown problems, or otherwise organize your software--think about design patterns as another tool to add to your developer toolbox. We will start this talk by introducing the taxonomy of design patterns at a high level, how to read a UML diagram (as a quick refresher), a refresher on inheritance vs composition, and then spend the rest of the time on walking through the implementation of several design patterns. Attendees will leave this talk ready to implement and use design patterns in C++.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Shah

Mike Shah

Assistant Teaching Professor, Northeastern University
Michael D. Shah completed his Ph.D. at Tufts University in the Redline Research Group in 2017. His Ph.D. thesis advisor was Samuel Z. Guyer. Michael finished his Masters degree in Computer Science in 2013 at Tufts University and Bachelors in Computers Science Engineering at The Ohio... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Back to Basics

12:00 MDT

Fuzzing Class Interfaces for Generating and Running Tests with libFuzzer
Although various frameworks support the writing of unit tests, creating a well designed effective unit test suite is still a non-trivial manual work. In this presentation we show how fuzzing can be used to automatically generate and run test cases based only on the class' interface.

Imagine you want test a container like the std::deque, essentially a vector of fix sized buffers with push/pop operations at both ends. You write tests for the empty container, then for push_back, but then how to continue? Write test for push_back then pop_back or push_back then pop_front and then push_front etc... We see that there is an explosion of the number of possible test cases with regarding all the interface operations. Should we write all the combinations of all interface calls? Is there a value writing a test with 5 or 15 push_backs? Will we miss to write test for 16 push_backs when the implementation is forced to allocate new block?

In this presentation we show a method when the clang libFuzzer library is used to generate and run unit test cases automatically based on the class interface description. Instead of using the libFuzzer generated byte string as an input, we interpret it as a list of member function calls and their arguments. Driven by the coverage guidance of libFuzzer, we are able to generate more and more complex combinations of interface calls. Giving optional preconditions for the interface functions we can filter out invalid combinations, like calling pop_back before inserting elements to a container. We check class invariants between every method call and various sanitizers can also be applied. The implementation uses only language native solutions, no code generations or external scripts are required.

Like other fuzzer solutions this automatic tester can run for arbitrary time to discover edge cases the programmer ignored. The close to minimal subset of discovered test cases providing the maximum coverage can be stored as a "regression test" to re-run later. The implemented prototype performed well both on artificial test cases and real world C++ containers. The prototype is available at: https://gitlab.com/wilzegers/autotest

Speakers
BB

Barnabás Bágyi

Software Developer, Ericsson
Barnabás is a graduating master student at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. Currently he is working at Ericsson. He gained experience using C++ in the automotive and the telecom industry.


Thursday September 17, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Testing

13:30 MDT

Back to Basics: Move Semantics
Move semantics was one of the many powerful additions to C++11, solving several classes of programming problems that had vexed C++ developers for years. But move semantics can be easily misused, and the details are sometimes tricky to get right. This back-to-basics session will give you a solid foundation in move semantics, covering rvalue references, std::move, move constructors, and move assignment operators. More importantly, it will present a set of clear guidelines for when and how to use these tools, and describe some situations where move semantics are most useful. This session will be helpful both for those who are still learning how to write solid, robust C++ code, and for those who already know everything about move semantics and would like a refresher. Attendees will leave this session having learned, among other things, how to read code sprinkled with calls to std::move and how to write classes that behave correctly and efficiently when moved.

Speakers
avatar for David Olsen

David Olsen

Software engineer, NVIDIA
David Olsen has more than two decades of software development experience in a variety of programming languages and development environments. For the last three years he has been the lead engineer for the PGI C++ compiler at NVIDIA. He is a member of the ISO C++ committee.


Thursday September 17, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Back to Basics
  Back to Basics

13:30 MDT

Monoids, Monads, and Applicative Functors: Repeated Software Patterns
Forget factories, singletons, and proxies; What are the real patterns in software development? This talk explores abstract mathematical structures that commonly recur in software development. Once a mind is trained to recognize these patterns, it becomes easy to identify the fundamental operations for domain specific classes and how to put the pieces together. This discussion is for those who enjoy math, abstract concepts, and expanding their minds.

Speakers
avatar for David Sankel

David Sankel

Bloomberg
David Sankel is a Software Engineering Manager/TL at Bloomberg and an active member of the C++ Standardization Committee. His experience spans microservice architectures, CAD/CAM, computer graphics, visual programming languages, web applications, computer vision, and cryptography... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
generate_n()

13:30 MDT

Making Games Start Fast: A Story About Concurrency
A common complaint in game development is that games take to long to start up. Players hate it and developers waste a long time watching loading screens.
Last spring I dived into my game's startup code and figured out ways to shave tens of seconds out of the time to reach main menu, and was able to introduce similar benefits to most of our other titles by looking into threading efficiency.

In this port-mortem analysis, I will present the various steps I took to analyze concurrency, improve threading performance and reduce lock contention.
Attendees will be shown how Intel vTune can be used to profile threading issues, how "thread safe" APIs can be misleading and how re-architecturing code in a lock-free fashion can drastically improve throughput.
We will also briefly touch how user-facing application can cheat and achieve perceived speedups by knowing the users' workflow.

Speakers
avatar for Mathieu Ropert

Mathieu Ropert

Tech Lead, Paradox Development Studio
French C++ expert working on (somewhat) historical video games. Decided to upgrade his compiler once and has been blogging about build systems ever since. Past speaker at CppCon, Meeting C++ and ACCU. Used to run the Paris C++ User Group. Currently lives in Sweden.


Thursday September 17, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
destroy_n()
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

13:30 MDT

OO Considered Harmful
Is C++ on OO language? What does it mean to be an OO language anyway? What were the original goals, and how have they turned out?

What other approaches are there? Some say there was nothing wrong with Structured Programming and we should go back to that. Others push for a more Functional approach. There's also Logic Programming and others. Is there one right answer? Does it depend? Does it blend?

Experienced C++ programmers think of C++ as a Multi-Paradigm language, capable of moving between paradigms as needed. But is it particularly good at any particular one? Is that focus shifting? Where is it going, and why? What can we learn from other languages.

If all this sounds very abstract, be assured that we will look at real code and techniques you can apply today or, in some cases, the near future - as well as a glimpse of what may be down the road. More importantly we try to put it in a context that helps answer "why?"

Along the way we'll take a tour through C++'s approach to OO, Generic Programming and Functional Programming.

Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Thursday September 17, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
count_if()
  • Design

13:30 MDT

The Science of Unit Tests
Unit testing has emerged as one of the foundations of modern software development. There are plenty of good talks on how to write tests, full of good advice, guidelines, and procedures: "Test using only the public interface", "Use Test-Driven Development", "Write Behavior-Driven Tests".

But what are the fundamentals that lie beneath all the good advice? What principles should guide our testing?

This talk will start by reviewing the basics of good testing, and then explore the close relationship between unit testing and the scientific method. Unit tests are, in some sense, small scientific instruments to detect phenomena in our source code. When seen in this light, we can start to see *why* the good advice we've been getting is good, and how an empirical approach can help guide decisions about what, when, and how to test our code.

Speakers
avatar for Dave Steffen

Dave Steffen

Technical Lead, SciTec Inc.
Dave Steffen completed his Ph.D. in theoretical physics at Colorado State University in 2003, and promptly changed course for a career in software engineering. He has worked primarily in defence and aerospace, and is currently a technical lead at SciTec Inc.'s Boulder office. For... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 13:30 - 14:30 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Testing

14:45 MDT

Supercharge your productivity with CLion and just a few easy tricks
Think that learning to be productive with a complex tool like CLion takes a big investment? You might be surprised just how much you can get down with just a handful of simple shortcuts. One of them even makes it easy to find everything else you might need. We'll look at navigating code like a pro, finding and fixing code issues on the fly, refactoring and even generating code.

Join us in the JetBrains Demo Room.

(This demo is also presented at 08:40 today.)

Speakers
avatar for Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Developer Advocate, JetBrains
Developer Advocate at JetBrains, author of Catch/Catch2, co-host of cpp.chat, host of C++ London, chair and organiser of C++ on Sea.


Thursday September 17, 2020 14:45 - 15:00 MDT
_1

15:00 MDT

Lightning Talks
Come for bite size talks you'll want more of!

Moderators
avatar for Michael Caisse

Michael Caisse

Ciere Consulting
Michael Caisse has been crafting code in C++ for 30-years. He is a regular speaker at various conferences and is passionate about teaching and training. Michael is the owner of Ciere which provides Software Contracting services, C++ training, and Project Recovery for failing multidisciplinary... Read More →

Thursday September 17, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
destroy_n()

15:00 MDT

C++ Committee's Library Evolution Working Group
Come join the leaders of the C++ Committee's Library Evolution Working Group to discuss the latest developments in and future of the C++ Standard Library.

Moderators
avatar for Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

CUDA C++ Core Libraries Lead, NVIDIA

Speakers
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →
avatar for Nevin Liber

Nevin Liber

Computer Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory
Nevin ":-)" Liber is a C++ Committee member and a veteran C++ developer, having first discovered the language over three decades ago while at Bell Labs. His professional career has taken him from operating systems to embedded systems, and from low latency trading platforms to analyzing... Read More →
avatar for Fabio Fracassi

Fabio Fracassi

Senior Lecturer, CODE University of Applied Sciences
Fabio has been a C++ Enthusiast for over a decade. He was initially drawn by graphical user applications, especially in the medical field, but started to focus on development processes and software quality more and more over the Years.He is now working as a university instructor... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
count_if()

15:45 MDT

ArcGIS Runtime for Qt
A brief introduction to the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt

This will be a 10 minute presentation, followed by a 5 minute Q/A session.

* This session will be held in the Esri Expo Room. *

Speakers
avatar for James Ballard

James Ballard

Developer, Esri
Lead Software Engineer for the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt.Worked at Esri since 2008.


Thursday September 17, 2020 15:45 - 16:00 MDT
_1

16:00 MDT

C++ Pub Quiz
The Pub Quiz so nice, we're doing it twice! A new batch of questions for a new evening. You're welcome to join us no matter whether you attended Wednesday evening's session or not. You're encouraged to mix up the existing teams and choose new team names. Teams are also encouraged to leave an empty chair at their table; you never know who might drop in during the game!

What is C++ Pub Quiz, you ask? It's trivia night CppCon style — five rounds, ten questions per round. Write down your team’s answers on a sheet of paper and turn it in at the end of the round.

Remo's "table" system seems ideal for this, so here's the deal: We'll meet in this event's Remo room at the scheduled time. Join a table near the front of the room with whoever you want to be on your team; turn on your mic in Remo. In the Remo general chat, I'll post a Google Meet URL and a Google Form URL. Open the Google Meet in a second tab; turn off your mic in Google Meet.

Each team should pick a team name, and designate a "team captain" who will use the Google Form to submit their answer sheet at the end of each round.

I'll read each round's questions into the Google Meet. (You will be listening in the Google Meet; or, you might designate a "team communications officer" who will be in the Meet with their mic off and their speakers on, relaying the audio through to everyone at their Remo table. Either way should work.) During the round, feel free to converse with your teammates around the table. At the end of the round, the "team captain" will submit your answer sheet via the Google Form, and we'll have a short break while I tally the scores.

High score after five rounds wins both the game and the bragging rights!

Staff
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Thursday September 17, 2020 16:00 - 18:30 MDT
generate_n()

16:15 MDT

Student Reception
An opportunity for student attendees and CppCon student program coordinators to informally meet in the Hallway Track.  Come in, have a seat, move around to different tables as you like, and get to know each other in a virtual setting.  We'll meet on the top floor (10th) and imagine a view of the Rocky Mountains and the Denver skyline.

Note that this event targets students, but anyone that wants to engage with students is welcome.

(If the 10th floor overflows, meet on the 9th.)

Thursday September 17, 2020 16:15 - 17:45 MDT
Hallway Track
 
Friday, September 18
 

07:45 MDT

ArcGIS Runtime for Qt
A brief introduction to the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt

This will be a 10 minute presentation, followed by a 5 minute Q/A session.

* This session will be held in the Esri Expo Room. *

Speakers
avatar for James Ballard

James Ballard

Developer, Esri
Lead Software Engineer for the ArcGIS Runtime SDK for Qt.Worked at Esri since 2008.


Friday September 18, 2020 07:45 - 08:00 MDT
_1

08:00 MDT

BoF: Functional Programming
Nathan has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested functional programming.

We will hold this BoF in a Zoom meeting. To join the Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/93313834474?pwd=Z1lUY2dvaUh6NU1VZ0FNVUlhM0tNQT09

Attendees interested in discussing functional programming, can join the discussion channel at #sig_functional_programming.

Moderators
NW

Nathan Ward

Student, CU Boulder

Friday September 18, 2020 08:00 - 08:45 MDT
_1

08:00 MDT

BoF: Game Development
Colleen has requested a Birds of a Feather meeting for attendees interested game development.

We will hold this BoF in a Zoom meeting. To join the Zoom Meeting
https://zoom.us/j/93793148520?pwd=TDgzSXk1eThSbE1ReWU5KytOUmI0QT09

Attendees interested in discussing game development, can join the discussion channel at #sig_game_development.

Speakers
CF

Colleen Finnegan

Digital/Micropro HW, Sr, Mitre


Friday September 18, 2020 08:00 - 08:45 MDT
_1

09:00 MDT

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs: SICP
This talk will summarise what can be learned from the infamous MIT textbook the Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, the book that some engineers have referred to as their "bible." Concepts that are taught in the book will be shown in modern C++ (as opposed to Scheme or a LISP dialect that is used in the textbook). Some of the concepts include: functions, higher order functions, abstract data representations, concurrency & streams and metalinguistic abstraction.

This is the first book that the The Programming Languages Virtual Meetup (PLVM) worked their way through. The PLVM had their first meeting in May 2020 and have been working their way through the book since then.

Link to free copy of SICP: https://web.mit.edu/alexmv/6.037/sicp.pdf)
Link to PLVM: https://www.meetup.com/Programming-Languages-Toronto-Meetup

Speakers
avatar for Conor Hoekstra

Conor Hoekstra

Senior Library Software Engineer, NVIDIA
Conor is a Senior Library Software Engineer at NVIDIA working on the RAPIDS team. He is extremely passionate about programming languages, algorithms and beautiful code. He is the founder and organizer of the Programming Languages Virtual Meetup and he has a YouTube channel... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
destroy_n()

09:00 MDT

Adventures in SIMD-Thinking (part 1 of 2)
SIMD capabilities are virtually ubiquitous in modern computing hardware, and yet much of that computing capacity often goes unused. This talk will provide a high-level overview of the SSE, AVX, and AVX-512 instruction set architecture provided by Intel microprocessors, and provide some specific examples of real-world problems where additional performance can be gained by thinking "vertically".

We'll begin with a quick, high-level description of the features provided by the SSE, AVX, and AVX-512 instruction sets. We'll then use C++ to compose a simple API employing various compiler intrinsics implementing those instruction sets. At the lowest level, the API will wrap some primitive operations, and then build some very useful basic operations (like multi-register shift) upon those primitives. We'll then build some facilities for comparison and arithmetic, and finally round out the API with functions for load and store. During all of this, we'll use C++ to provide type safety, reduce complexity, and maximize performance.

Next, we'll take a look at how this simple API can be used to improve performance for a handful of interesting problems, like sorting the values stored in a register to create a very fast 1-D median filter, or high-speed convolution and correlation with kernels that fit within a single register. Finally, we'll revisit the UTF-8 to UTF-32 conversion techniques presented at CppCon two years ago to see whether using AVX can make an already fast conversion algorithm even faster.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Embedded
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

09:00 MDT

Taskflow: A General-purpose Parallel and Heterogeneous Task Programming System Using Modern C++
The Taskflow project addresses the long-standing question: "How can we make it easier for developers to write parallel and heterogeneous programs with high performance and simultaneous high productivity?" Modern scientific computing relies on a heterogeneous mix of computational patterns, domain algorithms, and specialized hardware to achieve key scientific milestones that go beyond traditional capabilities. However, programming these applications often requires complex expert-level tools and a deep understanding of software methodologies. Specifically, the lack of a suitable software environment that can overcome the complexity of programming large parallel and heterogeneous systems has posed a significant barrier for many organizations to facilitate transformational discoveries.

Taskflow develops a simple and powerful task programming model to enable efficient implementations of heterogeneous decomposition strategies. Our programming model empowers users with both static and dynamic task graph constructions to incorporate a broad range of computational patterns including hybrid CPU-GPU computing, dynamic control flow, and irregularity. We develop an efficient heterogeneous work-stealing strategy that adapts worker threads to available task parallelism at any time during the graph execution. We have demonstrated promising performance of Taskflow on both micro-benchmark and real-world applications. As an example, we solved a large machine learning workload by up to 1.5× faster, 1.6× less memory, and 1.7× fewer lines of code than two industrial-strength systems, oneTBB and StarPU, on a machine of 40 CPUs and 4 GPUs.

This talk will cover three aspects: (1) heterogeneous task programming model using modern C++, (2) an efficient work-stealing strategy generalizable to arbitrary heterogeneous domains, and (3) user experience we have obtained and suggested roadmap for C++ in face of future heterogeneity.

The Taskflow project is available at https://taskflow.github.io/

Speakers
avatar for Tsung-Wei Huang

Tsung-Wei Huang

Assistant Professor, University of Utah
As a university faculty member, a central theme of my research is to make parallel computing easier to handle. I am passionate about using modern C++ technology to solve parallel and heterogeneous computing problems. One such effort is my Taskflow project (https://taskflow.github.io... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing

09:00 MDT

Retiring the Singleton Pattern: Concrete Suggestions for What to use Instead
“The worst part of this whole topic is that the people who hate singletons rarely give concrete suggestions for what to use instead.” - stackoverflow

In this talk, we will explore just such an approach that will transform currently untestable code containing underlying singletons with a fully testable solution. These code changes are transparent to the original callers of that function so no calling code changes are required.

This approach will be further expanded to handle multiple interdependent singletons. The replacement of error prone specific order of initialization calls to the singletons will be exchanged for "hard to misuse" automatic initialization using features of the language.

A host of other potential real world problems with replacing singletons are shown with solutions presented for both legacy and modern C++.

This alternative approach has been successfully employed in multiple areas in Bloomberg where developers believed there was no other feasible choice.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Muldoon

Peter Muldoon

Senior developer, Bloomberg
C++ Design implementation of large distributed systems.


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
count_if()
  • Design

09:00 MDT

Halide: A Language for Fast, Portable Computation on Images and Tensors
Halide is an open-source, domain-specific language for optimizing image processing, machine learning, and general array processing. It is used by major companies like Google, Adobe, and Qualcomm to optimize performance-critical software. It processes every photo taken with a Pixel phone, composites layers in every Photoshop document, and handles video processing at scale at YouTube.

We will explore how Halide achieves top-tier performance in a fraction of the development time by separating the algorithm (what to compute) from the schedule (how to optimize it). Halide's schedules determine trade-offs between parallelism, vectorization, cache locality, and memory management in a simple, modular way. Programmers can easily target different CPUs and GPUs by writing multiple schedules. Halide integrates tightly with C++ and provides both a JIT and a C++ compatible ahead-of-time compiler.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Reinking

Alex Reinking

Programming Languages Researcher, UC Berkeley
Alex is a Ph.D. student at UC Berkeley working with Jonathan Ragan-Kelley on designing domain-specific languages for high-performance computing. He has previously worked at Microsoft Research and Facebook AI+R. He holds an MS in Computer Science from UC Berkeley and a BS in Computer... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
generate_n()

09:00 MDT

Back to Basics: Exceptions
Exceptions are the native error propagation mechanism in C++. If used properly, exceptions enable us to write simpler, more readable and more robust code. However, the path there can be tricky and unfortunately the exception mechanism isn't without flaws. This talk sheds somelight on the current issues with exceptions and why a large part of the C++ community isn't using them. It also gives guidelines and best practices on how to deal with exceptions and how touse them properly. It will go into detail about the exception safety guarantees, explains the tradeoffs between them, and demonstrates by example the individual steps necessary to reach them.

Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 09:00 - 10:00 MDT
Back to Basics

10:00 MDT

AMA: Klaus Iglberger
Join Klaus Iglberg for an open question session.

Klaus offers training in C++ is the author of the Blaze C++ math library.

Speakers
avatar for Klaus Iglberger

Klaus Iglberger

C++ Trainer, C++ Trainer
Klaus Iglberger is a freelancing C++ trainer and consultant. He has finished his PhD in computer science in 2010 and since then is focused on large-scale C++ software design. He shares his experience in popular advanced C++ courses around the world (mainly in Germany, but also the... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 10:00 - 10:20 MDT
Back to Basics

10:00 MDT

AMA: Peter Muldoon
Join Peter Muldoon for an open question session on removing singletons from code bases.


Speakers
avatar for Peter Muldoon

Peter Muldoon

Senior developer, Bloomberg
C++ Design implementation of large distributed systems.


Friday September 18, 2020 10:00 - 10:20 MDT
count_if()

10:30 MDT

Adventures in SIMD-Thinking (part 2 of 2)
SIMD capabilities are virtually ubiquitous in modern computing hardware, and yet much of that computing capacity often goes unused. This talk will provide a high-level overview of the SSE, AVX, and AVX-512 instruction set architecture provided by Intel microprocessors, and provide some specific examples of real-world problems where additional performance can be gained by thinking "vertically".

We'll begin with a quick, high-level description of the features provided by the SSE, AVX, and AVX-512 instruction sets. We'll then use C++ to compose a simple API employing various compiler intrinsics implementing those instruction sets. At the lowest level, the API will wrap some primitive operations, and then build some very useful basic operations (like multi-register shift) upon those primitives. We'll then build some facilities for comparison and arithmetic, and finally round out the API with functions for load and store. During all of this, we'll use C++ to provide type safety, reduce complexity, and maximize performance.

Next, we'll take a look at how this simple API can be used to improve performance for a handful of interesting problems, like sorting the values stored in a register to create a very fast 1-D median filter, or high-speed convolution and correlation with kernels that fit within a single register. Finally, we'll revisit the UTF-8 to UTF-32 conversion techniques presented at CppCon two years ago to see whether using AVX can make an already fast conversion algorithm even faster.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing


Friday September 18, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
Embedded
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

10:30 MDT

Back to Basics: Concurrency
One of C++11's flagship features was the introduction of std::thread, along with a complete suite of synchronization primitives and useful patterns such as thread-safe static initialization. In this session, we'll motivate C++11's threading model and explain how to use std::thread effectively. We'll compare and contrast the C++11 synchronization primitives (mutex, condition variable, reader-writer lock, and once-flag) as well as the primitives that are new in C++20 (semaphore, latch, and barrier). In particular, we'll show how to make a mutex and a condition variable work together.
When using threads, it's important to avoid shared mutable state. We'll show how to tame that state via the "blue/green deployment" pattern, and briefly discuss how to use std::future and std::async to safely handle threads that produce answers.
Attendees will leave this session with a strong grasp on "multithreading tactics" in C++11 and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
Back to Basics

10:30 MDT

Not Leaving Performance On The Jump Table
In this laptop I will use to talk to you, std::function is measured to have, for normal use cases, a latency overhead of over 79% for dispatching compared to just using function pointers. Our colleagues at Facebook improve in folly::Function by over 14%, however the open source Zoo libraries’ implementations I will talk to you about improves upon folly’s at least another 24% (35% over libc++) while at the same time dramatically reducing the object code size and allowing lots of practical features being proposed for what Arthur O’Dwyer calls “the design space of std::function“, all with top performance. When I report these findings colleagues have a hard time believing them, the presumption is by this time we should know well how to implement this with nearly theoretical maximum performance; then I must be wrong, my implementation has got to be severely flawed in some way... yet this library is used extensively in a mobile app that has over 200 million daily active users, in Android, iOS, and Windows, Mac OS X apps.

The improvements come from performance oversights that indeed have lasted for decades, once I tell you what they are, together with simple yet rigorous benchmarks and compiler explorer links, you will have no trouble to understand the improvements and realizing there are general principles we could learn from. That’s what this presentation is about.

Improving std::function is just the tip of the iceberg, when it comes to dispatching to behavior specified at runtime, there are many performance mistakes concerning the design of callbacks, event subscription/publishing mechanisms, and even the very language supports runtime polymorphism in a way that is very hostile to performance, among other problems. I hope to tell you all about the solutions we have found for these problems in the presentation “Type Erasing The Pains Of Runtime Polymorphism”, here we will focus exclusively on attaining nearly maximal performance while dispatching to runtime specified user code.

The techniques to be discussed are not processor architecture specific but general, directly applicable to components such as std::function, std::variant, their hybrids, throwing exceptions, error handling, the visitor design pattern, and the whole of runtime polymorphism. Furthermore, the examples are from real life improvements.

Speakers
avatar for Eduardo Madrid

Eduardo Madrid

Tech Lead, Snap, Inc.
Eduardo has been working for many years on financial technologies, automated trading in particular, and other areas where performance challenges can be solved in C++. He contributes to open source projects and teaches advanced courses on Software Engineering with emphasis in Generic... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
generate_n()

10:30 MDT

Lakos’20: The “Dam” Book is Done!
Writing reliable and maintainable C++ software is hard. Designing such software at scale adds a new set of challenges. Large-scale systems require more than just a thorough understanding of the logical design concepts addressed in most popular texts. To be successful on an enterprise scale, developers must also address physical design, a dimension of software engineering that may be unfamiliar even to expert developers.

After more than two decades in the making, Large-Scale C++, Volume I: Process and Architecture, is finally here. Drawing on his over 30 years of hands-on experience building massive, mission-critical enterprise systems, John Lakos, using select excerpts from this glisteningly new volume, elucidates the essential value of (and several techniques needed for) creating and growing hierarchical reusable software a.k.a. Software Capital as the foundation for developing C++ software at virtually unbounded scale.

Speakers
avatar for John Lakos

John Lakos

Software Engineer, Bloomberg Lp
John Lakos, author of Large-Scale C++ Software Design, serves at Bloomberg LP in New York City as a senior architect and mentor for C++ Software Development world-wide.  He is also an active voting member of the C++ Standards Committee’s Evolution Working Group. Previously, Dr... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
destroy_n()
  • Design

10:30 MDT

Exceptions Under the Spotlight
The exceptions mechanism is a complex topic and has been enthusiastically discussed in the last WG21 committee meeting.

In this talk we will dive into the world of exceptions.

We will start by understanding the error handling mechanism.

We will explore the evolution of exceptions, and the design decisions that led to the current version.

Next, we will see its usage as part of the program, and analyze the overhead by breaking the exceptions mechanism to bits.

Last, we will describe and analyze the alternatives, and potential directions for the exceptions mechanism in a future C++ versions.

Speakers
avatar for Inbal Levi

Inbal Levi

Software Engineer, SolarEdge
Inbal Levi is an embedded software engineer with a passion for high performance.She is one of the organizers of CoreCpp conference and CoreCpp user group.She's also a member of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC22/WG21 (the C++ Standards Committee), and among the founders of the Israeli NB Mirror c... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 10:30 - 11:30 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing

12:00 MDT

The Networking TS from Scratch: I/O Objects
The facilities of the Networking TS provide a framework within which testable, extensible, asynchronous programs may be written in C++. Alongside this the Networking TS provides concrete “I/O object” types which provide means of performing I/O and thereby allow the authoring of such programs immediately.

Invariably these provided I/O objects will not be sufficient. Datagram and stream sockets do not describe the entire universe of asynchronous I/O. When the time comes to author new I/O objects it will be important to do so within the framework of the Networking TS thereby providing facilities ripe for reuse and composition.

The talk will explore the task of authoring new I/O object types by motivating and illustrating the facilities and patterns the Networking TS provides for this purpose.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Leahy

Robert Leahy

Senior Software Engineer, MayStreet Inc.
Robert is a graduate of the University of Victoria where he specialized in graphics, gaming, and digital geometry processing. After 4.5 years in full stack web development he switched to financial infrastructure software development in early 2017. He’s since become involved in the... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
generate_n()
  • Concurrent/Async/Parallel

12:00 MDT

Some Things C++ Does Right
People often complain about C++: to some, it's not memory-safe enough, not type-safe enough. Some will tell you that some (or all!) of its defaults are wrong. Many complain that it's too expert-friendly.

There's often a grain of truth in criticism, and C++ surely has a bit of each of these alleged warts; it's a language that has history, obviously, and that has evolved organically over the years, and it has the imperfections we can expect for a tool used by millions to perform high-performance or safety- critical tasks in various application domains.

However, there are a significant number of things C++ does right, and there are a number of reasons why we love this language... and love it so much that we gather together to trade ideas, learn about it, understand it better... and enjoy it all!

This talk is about some of the things C++ does right. It does not aim to provide an exhaustive list (far from it!), or to throw arrows at other languages (although there will be comparisons), nor does it aim to offer an apologetic perspective on C++. This talk is about some of those things one misses when using other languages, and aims to remind us of some of those things that make C++ beautiful, fun and efficient.

Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
count_if()

12:00 MDT

How C++20 Changes the Way We Write Code
The upcoming C++20 standard is the biggest update in a decade. Its feature set and their impact on how we write C++ will be as large, and possibly larger than that of C++11.

In this talk we will look at how new features like concepts, coroutines, and modules will fundamentally change the way we design libraries, the way we think about functions, and even the way we compile our code. We will also mention some long-standing warts in C++ which are finally cured.

Speakers
avatar for Timur Doumler

Timur Doumler

Cradle
Timur Doumler is a C++ developer specialising in audio and music technology, an active member of the ISO C++ committee, and Conference Chair of the Audio Developer Conference (ADC). He is passionate about building communities, clean code, good tools, and the evolution of C++.


Friday September 18, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
destroy_n()
  • Future of C++

12:00 MDT

Functional Error and Optional-value Handling with STX
Error-handling is arguably the most divergent part of C++. Many coding guidelines partially allow exceptions or totally ban it and this leads to many projects supporting multiple error-handling interfaces such as exceptions, the error-prone c-style error-handling, and/or custom error-handling types. This also leads many C++ developers to not use exceptions and instead roll their in-house error and optional-value handling facilities which are duplicated across the ecosystem.

This divergence has birthed numerous projects like boost.expected, boost.outcome, boost.leaf, tl::optional, tl::expected, and many others that have done a great job at addressing these issues.

This talk introduces STX; a C++ library that tries to address some of these concerns with error and optional-value handling in the C++ ecosystem and also tries to unify some of these efforts/implementations.

Speakers
avatar for Basit Ayantunde

Basit Ayantunde

Student, University of Ilorin
Basit Ayantunde is an undergraduate at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria where he majors in Mechanical Engineering. Basit has 4 years of experience writing industrial software both as a contract software developer and intern. He is one of the C++Now 2020 scholars, he contributes to... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Embedded

12:00 MDT

Introducing Microsoft’s New Open Source Fuzzing Platform
This native code security talk is a joint presentation by Principals from Windows Security (COSINE) and Microsoft Research. The work by Google and other contributors to the llvm ecosystem on libfuzzer, ASan, and sancov have “shifted left” the field of fuzz testing from the hands of hackers and security auditors directly to CI/CD developers. Rather than waiting for an auditing gate, developers should be able to receive fuzz testing results directly from their build system: quickly, cheaply, and reliably without false positives. To this end, Microsoft is adopting this testing paradigm via continuous cloud-based fuzzing of dedicated test binaries.

Microsoft is currently fuzzing Windows continuously in Azure using libfuzzer and a fuzzing platform developed at Microsoft Research that we are releasing as Open Source at CppCon. Developers continuously building libfuzzer-based test binaries utilizing sanitizers and coverage instrumentation can now launch fuzzing jobs in the cloud with a single command line. This talk will introduce the framework and its capabilities including a live demo. Features include:

• Composable fuzzing workflows: Open Source allows users to onboard their own fuzzers, swap instrumentation, introduce corpora,
• Built-in ensemble fuzzing: By default, fuzzers work as a team that shares strengths, swapping inputs of interest between fuzzing technologies
• Programmatic triage & result deduplication: Get unique flaw cases that always reproduce
• On-demand live-debugging of found crashes: Summon a live debugging session on-demand or from your build system
• Observable & Debug-able: Transparent design allows introspection into every stage
• Detailed telemetry: Easily monitor all your fuzzing from ‘fuzztop’
• Fuzz on Windows & Linux OSes: Multi-platform by design
• Crash reporting notification callbacks: Currently supporting Microsoft Teams
• Code Coverage KPIs: Monitor your progress and motivate testing using code coverage as key metric

Speakers
avatar for Michael Walker

Michael Walker

Senior Director, Microsoft
Mike Walker is a Senior Director at MSR Special Projects. Prior to joining Microsoft, Mike led DARPA’s Cyber Grand Challenge, a two-year $58M contest to construct & compete the first prototypes of reasoning cyberdefense systems. Mike has worked in a policy advisory role, testifying... Read More →
JC

Justin Campbell

Microsoft
Justin Campbell is a Principal at Microsoft COSINE whose group is focused on Windows OS security: vulnerability testing at scale, sandboxing and mitigations. Justin was previously VP of Cyber Operations at Novetta and served as CTO at Ocean’s Edge.


Friday September 18, 2020 12:00 - 13:00 MDT
Fuzzing/Testing
  • Testing

13:00 MDT

AMA: Patrice Roy
Join Patrice Roy for a hallway-style discussion on any topic such as:
  • C++ in academia
  • teaching C++
  • game development

Speakers
avatar for Patrice Roy

Patrice Roy

Professeur, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrice Roy has been playing with C++, either professionally, for pleasure or (most of the time) both for over 25 years. After a few years doing R&D and working on military flight simulators, he moved on to academics and has been teaching computer science since 1998. Since 2005, he’s... Read More →


Friday September 18, 2020 13:00 - 13:20 MDT
count_if()

13:00 MDT

AMA: Timur Doumler
Join Timur Doumler for a free-wheeling hallway-style discussion.

Timur is a long time audio dev and is very active in the C++ developer community. Be sure to ask him about the Audio Developer Conference coming up in November!

Speakers
avatar for Timur Doumler

Timur Doumler

Cradle
Timur Doumler is a C++ developer specialising in audio and music technology, an active member of the ISO C++ committee, and Conference Chair of the Audio Developer Conference (ADC). He is passionate about building communities, clean code, good tools, and the evolution of C++.


Friday September 18, 2020 13:00 - 13:20 MDT
destroy_n()

13:30 MDT

Empirically Measuring, and Reducing, C++’s Accidental Complexity (“Simplifying C++” #7 of N)
We often hear “C++ is more complex than it needs to be,” typically demonstrated using anecdotes and “gotcha” examples. Those can be valid and demonstrate real pain points, but it would be nice to have more quantifiable data that we could analyze to measure sources of complexity. This talk reports work to systematically catalog and measure C++’s unneeded complexity, how some current evolution proposals may address its major sources, and presents specific suggestions on what we might be able to do about it in the context of a future-evolution proposal to simplify parameter passing and provide meaningful initialization guarantees in C++.

Speakers
avatar for Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter

Microsoft
Herb is the chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, a programming language architect at Microsoft, and the author of over 200 articles and 4 books about C++ and related topics.


Friday September 18, 2020 13:30 - 14:45 MDT
all_of()
  • Future of C++

13:30 MDT

[Overflow] Empirically Measuring, and Reducing, C++’s Accidental Complexity (“Simplifying C++” #7 of N)
If the all_of() track is full, then join us in generate_n() as the overflow room.


We often hear “C++ is more complex than it needs to be,” typically demonstrated using anecdotes and “gotcha” examples. Those can be valid and demonstrate real pain points, but it would be nice to have more quantifiable data that we could analyze to measure sources of complexity. This talk reports work to systematically catalog and measure C++’s unneeded complexity, how some current evolution proposals may address its major sources, and presents specific suggestions on what we might be able to do about it in the context of a future-evolution proposal to simplify parameter passing and provide meaningful initialization guarantees in C++.

Speakers
avatar for Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter

Microsoft
Herb is the chair of the ISO C++ standards committee, a programming language architect at Microsoft, and the author of over 200 articles and 4 books about C++ and related topics.


Friday September 18, 2020 13:30 - 14:45 MDT
generate_n()

15:00 MDT

CppCon 2021 Kick-off Meeting / Feedback Session
Wow! CppCon 2020 was not what anyone would have expected a year ago. 😁
Who knows what CppCon 2021 will be like? You could help determine that.

Bob is going to moderate a Zoom meeting to discuss what went right and what went wrong at CppCon 2020 with an eye to what we want to create for CppCon 2021.

CppCon is and always has been a product by and for the C++ community. This is your chance shape that product for 2021.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83727755426?pwd=WGV6M25SdGdJb05oTlI3ZG5DSVFKQT09



Moderators
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing

Friday September 18, 2020 15:00 - 16:00 MDT
_1
 
Saturday, September 19
 

08:00 MDT

CppCon 2021 Kick-off Meeting / Feedback Session
Wow! CppCon 2020 was not what anyone would have expected a year ago. 😁
Who knows what CppCon 2021 will be like? You could help determine that.

Bob is going to moderate a Zoom meeting to discuss what went right and what went wrong at CppCon 2020 with an eye to what we want to create for CppCon 2021.

CppCon is and always has been a product by and for the C++ community. This is your chance shape that product for 2021.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81976101183?pwd=VU5Uc3JRbW1aMlBDdUxGcFVuRi9EZz09

For those individuals that are Time Zone challenged to attend this meeting, a second session will be held at 2020-09-19T80:00-06. You are welcome to attend either (or both) of the sessions that work for your schedule.

Moderators
avatar for Bob Steagall

Bob Steagall

Chief Cook and Bottle Washer, KEWB Computing

Saturday September 19, 2020 08:00 - 09:00 MDT
_1
 
Monday, September 21
 

09:00 MDT

C++ Concepts: Constraining C++ Templates in C++20 and Before
C++ Concepts: Constraining C++ Templates in C++20 and Before is a two-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Mateusz Pusz. It is offered online from 11AM to 3PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st and Tuesday September 22nd, 2020 (after the conference).

In order to be able to follow the workshop, you should be current with C++ and have some recent experience with writing simple C++ templates. C++11/14 knowledge is suggested but not mandatory.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Mateusz Pusz

Mateusz Pusz

Principal Software Engineer | Founder & C++ Trainer, EPAM Systems | Train IT
A software architect, principal engineer, and security champion with more than 15 years of experience in designing, writing, and maintaining C++ code for fun and living. A trainer with 10 years of C++ teaching experience, consultant, conference speaker, and evangelist. His main areas... Read More →


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 13:00 MDT
Classroom-Pusz

09:00 MDT

Portable Parallelism using Modern C++ and Thread Building Blocks
Portable Parallelism using Modern C++ and Threading Building Blocks is a two-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Michael Voss and Pablo Reble. It is offered online from 11AM to 3PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st and Tuesday September 22nd, 2020 (after the conference).

  • Knowledge of C++11/14 (including templates)
  • As an online class:
    • A reliable internet connection is necessary
    • The exact conference-call software will be announced later
  • To participate in hands-on examples:
    • Option 1: (the primary delivery method): Using the Intel ® DevCloud for oneAPI
      • A limited, but hopefully sufficient, number of instances will be pre-arranged for attendee use
      • All necessary software will be pre-installed on those systems
    • Option 2: On the attendee’s local system
      • A C++ compiler supporting C++14 or later
      • git
      • Due to time constraints, we will offer limited assistance for students that choose this option


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 13:00 MDT
Classroom-Reble-Voss

09:00 MDT

C++17: All You Need to Know
C++17: All You Need to Know is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Vittorio Romeo. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Good knowledge of C++11.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Romeo

09:00 MDT

Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators
Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Arthur O’Dwyer. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should have basic to intermediate knowledge of C++11, including at least one or two years of programming experience. A basic understanding of pointers, templates, data structures, and C++11 move semantics will be assumed.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-ODwyer

09:00 MDT

GPU Programming in Modern C++
GPU Programming in Modern C++ is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Gordon Brown and Michael Wong. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

This course requires the following:
  • Working knowledge of C++11.
  • Working knowledge of Git.
  • Working knowledge of CMake.

We will also encourage attendees to pre-setup a SYCL implementation on the laptop they attend with. Attendees will be contacted about this before the class.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Gordon Brown

Gordon Brown

Principal Software Engineer, Codeplay Software Ltd.
Gordon Brown is a principal software engineer at Codeplay Software specializing in heterogeneous programming models for C++. He has been involved in the standardization of the Khronos standard SYCL and the development of Codeplay’s implementation of the standard; ComputeCpp, from... Read More →


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Brown-Wong

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge
Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Steve Dewhurst. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should be experienced software developers with basic knowledge of C++ templates.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Stephen Dewhurst

Stephen Dewhurst

President, Semantics Consulting, Inc.
Steve Dewhurst is the co-founder and president of Semantics Consulting, Inc. Steve is the author of numerous technical articles on C++ programming techniques and compiler design, is the author of the critically acclaimed books C++ Common Knowledge and C++ Gotchas, and is the co-author... Read More →


Monday September 21, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Dewhurst
 
Tuesday, September 22
 

09:00 MDT

C++ Concepts: Constraining C++ Templates in C++20 and Before
C++ Concepts: Constraining C++ Templates in C++20 and Before is a two-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Mateusz Pusz. It is offered online from 11AM to 3PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st and Tuesday September 22nd, 2020 (after the conference).

In order to be able to follow the workshop, you should be current with C++ and have some recent experience with writing simple C++ templates. C++11/14 knowledge is suggested but not mandatory.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Mateusz Pusz

Mateusz Pusz

Principal Software Engineer | Founder & C++ Trainer, EPAM Systems | Train IT
A software architect, principal engineer, and security champion with more than 15 years of experience in designing, writing, and maintaining C++ code for fun and living. A trainer with 10 years of C++ teaching experience, consultant, conference speaker, and evangelist. His main areas... Read More →


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 13:00 MDT
Classroom-Pusz

09:00 MDT

Portable Parallelism using Modern C++ and Thread Building Blocks
Portable Parallelism using Modern C++ and Threading Building Blocks is a two-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Michael Voss and Pablo Reble. It is offered online from 11AM to 3PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st and Tuesday September 22nd, 2020 (after the conference).

  • Knowledge of C++11/14 (including templates)
  • As an online class:
    • A reliable internet connection is necessary
    • The exact conference-call software will be announced later
  • To participate in hands-on examples:
    • Option 1: (the primary delivery method): Using the Intel ® DevCloud for oneAPI
      • A limited, but hopefully sufficient, number of instances will be pre-arranged for attendee use
      • All necessary software will be pre-installed on those systems
    • Option 2: On the attendee’s local system
      • A C++ compiler supporting C++14 or later
      • git
      • Due to time constraints, we will offer limited assistance for students that choose this option


Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 13:00 MDT
Classroom-Reble-Voss

09:00 MDT

C++17: All You Need to Know
C++17: All You Need to Know is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Vittorio Romeo. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Good knowledge of C++11.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Romeo

09:00 MDT

Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators
Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Arthur O’Dwyer. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should have basic to intermediate knowledge of C++11, including at least one or two years of programming experience. A basic understanding of pointers, templates, data structures, and C++11 move semantics will be assumed.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-ODwyer

09:00 MDT

GPU Programming in Modern C++
GPU Programming in Modern C++ is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Gordon Brown and Michael Wong. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

This course requires the following:
  • Working knowledge of C++11.
  • Working knowledge of Git.
  • Working knowledge of CMake.

We will also encourage attendees to pre-setup a SYCL implementation on the laptop they attend with. Attendees will be contacted about this before the class.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Gordon Brown

Gordon Brown

Principal Software Engineer, Codeplay Software Ltd.
Gordon Brown is a principal software engineer at Codeplay Software specializing in heterogeneous programming models for C++. He has been involved in the standardization of the Khronos standard SYCL and the development of Codeplay’s implementation of the standard; ComputeCpp, from... Read More →


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Brown-Wong

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge
Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Steve Dewhurst. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should be experienced software developers with basic knowledge of C++ templates.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Stephen Dewhurst

Stephen Dewhurst

President, Semantics Consulting, Inc.
Steve Dewhurst is the co-founder and president of Semantics Consulting, Inc. Steve is the author of numerous technical articles on C++ programming techniques and compiler design, is the author of the critically acclaimed books C++ Common Knowledge and C++ Gotchas, and is the co-author... Read More →


Tuesday September 22, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Dewhurst
 
Wednesday, September 23
 

09:00 MDT

C++17: All You Need to Know
C++17: All You Need to Know is a two-day training course with programming examples taught by Vittorio Romeo. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Good knowledge of C++11.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Wednesday September 23, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Romeo

09:00 MDT

Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators
Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators is a three-day online training course with programming exercises taught by Arthur O’Dwyer. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT),  Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should have basic to intermediate knowledge of C++11, including at least one or two years of programming experience. A basic understanding of pointers, templates, data structures, and C++11 move semantics will be assumed.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Arthur O'Dwyer

Arthur O'Dwyer

C++ Trainer
Arthur O'Dwyer is the author of "Mastering the C++17 STL" (Packt 2017) and of professional training courses such as "Intro to C++," "Classic STL: Algorithms, Containers, Iterators," and "The STL From Scratch." (Ask me about training your new hires!) Arthur is occasionally active on... Read More →


Wednesday September 23, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-ODwyer

09:00 MDT

GPU Programming in Modern C++
GPU Programming in Modern C++ is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Gordon Brown and Michael Wong. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

This course requires the following:
  • Working knowledge of C++11.
  • Working knowledge of Git.
  • Working knowledge of CMake.

We will also encourage attendees to pre-setup a SYCL implementation on the laptop they attend with. Attendees will be contacted about this before the class.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Wong

Michael Wong

DE, Codeplay
wongmichael.com/about
avatar for Gordon Brown

Gordon Brown

Principal Software Engineer, Codeplay Software Ltd.
Gordon Brown is a principal software engineer at Codeplay Software specializing in heterogeneous programming models for C++. He has been involved in the standardization of the Khronos standard SYCL and the development of Codeplay’s implementation of the standard; ComputeCpp, from... Read More →


Wednesday September 23, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Brown-Wong

09:00 MDT

Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge
Modern C++ Template Common Knowledge is a two-day training course with programming exercises taught by Steve Dewhurst. It is offered online from 11AM to 5PM Eastern Time (EDT), Monday September 21st through Wednesday September 23rd, 2020 (after the conference).

Attendees should be experienced software developers with basic knowledge of C++ templates.

Course and instructor details are available here.

This course requires separate registration which is available here.


Speakers
avatar for Stephen Dewhurst

Stephen Dewhurst

President, Semantics Consulting, Inc.
Steve Dewhurst is the co-founder and president of Semantics Consulting, Inc. Steve is the author of numerous technical articles on C++ programming techniques and compiler design, is the author of the critically acclaimed books C++ Common Knowledge and C++ Gotchas, and is the co-author... Read More →


Wednesday September 23, 2020 09:00 - 15:00 MDT
Classroom-Dewhurst
 
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